Collegiate Church of St Mary Magdalene

Atrani, Italy

The Collegiate Church of St Mary Magdalene was founded in 1274 on the ruins of a medieval fortress on the initiative of Atrani. Over time the church has undergone considerable restoration. In 1570, near collapse, funds were raised by special taxes on wheat and export of manufactured goods to restore the church.

The building underwent a second operation almost a century later, in 1669. On that occasion it also repaired the sacristy which was equipped with an external counter. In 1753, as the population grew the church was enlarged and expanded by donations from private citizens in addition to the contribution of municipal regiment. It was during this work that the fortress was finally demolished in order to free up additional space enlargement. In recent times, it was renovated by the architect Lorenzo Casalbore of Salerno.

The church is decorated with two transepts. One ceiling is covered externally with tiles; the other has a flat roof. There are numerous statues and paintings placed in various side chapels: The Madonna shepherdess (famous sculpture of 1789) and The Incredulity of St. Thomas (work of the 16th century Salerno Andrea Sabatini). The facade of the church is considered the only example of Rococo on the Amalfi Coast. The terrace of the sacristy overlooks the Gulf of Salerno as the Belvedere of Villa Cimbrone. The bell tower, with its brown tuff, is reminiscent of the Madonna del Carmine in Naples.

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Founded: 1274
Category: Religious sites in Italy

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4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Luisa Criscuolo (2 years ago)
A beautiful Church that dominates the skyline of Atrani, a small fishermen's village on Amalfi Coast. It has different architectonic styles but the baroque is the most prominent.
Subotic Misa (3 years ago)
Ok .
Oleg Naumov (3 years ago)
Very beautiful, small Italian village situated at the Amalfi coast. That church is one of main local attractions.
Dave Albers (4 years ago)
It's a beautiful Church.
JF Genoud (4 years ago)
Great view point over the village and the bay.
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