Macellum of Naples

Naples, Italy

The Macellum of Naples was the macellum or market building of the Roman city of Neapolis, now known as Naples. Due to the rise of the ground level the macellum is now located beneath the church of San Lorenzo Maggiore. The first construction dates to 5th or 4th century BC when the area was the location of the agora during the Greek period. When Neapolis became a Roman possession it was eventually transformed into a macellum. This structure was covered by a mudslide in the 5th century AD, probably as a result of flooding.

An early Christian basilica was constructed over the remains of the covered macellum. Consequently, this basilica was replaced by new construction over the centuries. As a result, the mud slide preserved the remains of the macellum,

The macellum had an entrance to the north, where the Via dei Tribunali runs now. The rectangular building consists of a porticoed area with workshops and an internal open courtyard with mosaic floors. In the middle of the courtyard was a tholos, a circular building used for food selling. Small tabernae, a laundry and the treasury can still be recognized.

Today the macellum can be visited as a part of the monumental complex of San Lorenzo Maggiore.

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Address

Vico Maiorani 31, Naples, Italy
See all sites in Naples

Details

Founded: 400-500 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Italy

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Christian Jaburg (2 years ago)
Super interesting guided underground tour of an old market place from Roman times, buried for centuries. One learns a lot about the everyday life of the old Neapolitans, how they traded, dyed clothes or ran their laundries. Very competent guide, who spoke an excellent English, which made the tour really vivid.
Justin Peterson (2 years ago)
Not as big or as interesting as I had hoped, still worth checking out if you have nothing else to do for a couple hours. But I wouldn't go out of your way to see it.
Magda Ciurus (2 years ago)
Very interesting place, good quide telling all the details from the Roman city Market
Ildiko Varga (2 years ago)
We were a bit disappointed to find out that this is not the Napolis Sotterranea. These 2 are so close, you could think that they are the same but no! This was fun and interesting too but not the one we wanted to take. Here they showed the ancient streets and market below the church and gave so historical insights about how the places were used in the ancient time, how it was destroyed and why it was buried. Find a Naples tour booklet and find the 20% off coupon for this place. Only at the entrance you will know that you will have to pay additional 1 Euro for the guide, so the discounted rate is 7 Euro + 1 Euro for the guide per person. The tour is maximum 1 hr.
Wojciech Augustyniak (2 years ago)
THIS IS NOT NAPOLI SOTTERRANEA. This place have just a similar name and it is located in similar area. Also the tours are at the same time and for the same price. The visit is very very short and it cost 10euros. It is not worth it.
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