Stormont Castle is a mansion in east Belfast which is used as the main meeting place of the Northern Ireland Executive. It was never a castle as such: the original building was reworked in the nineteenth century in the Scottish baronial style with features such as bartizans used for decorative purposes.

Between 1921 and 1972, it served as the official residence of the Prime Minister of Northern Ireland. However, a number of prime ministers chose to live at Stormont House, the official residence of the Speaker of the House of Commons of Northern Ireland, which was empty as a number of speakers had chosen to live in their own homes. It also served as the location of the Cabinet Room of the Government of Northern Ireland from 1921 to 1972.

Before devolution it served as the Belfast headquarters of the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, Northern Ireland Office Ministers and supporting officials. During the Troubles, it was also used by MI5 officers.

The castle is open to the public each year on the European Heritage Open Day weekend.

References:
  • Wikipedia

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Details

Founded: 1830
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Ian Getgood (16 months ago)
Civil Service building
Joe Singleton (19 months ago)
A pity the northern Ireland government would make a come back
Daphne Harper (2 years ago)
Beautiful building and gardens.S hame no one's at home!
Laurie Wallace (2 years ago)
A place to visit in northern Island, historic buliding not only from a political prospective but an important location used to manage convoys in ww2. Grwat free tours around the building which is very impressive. If there is availability, you can get afternoon tea in the members dining room a great experience, all fresh food and served by lovely staff.
Darren Dines (2 years ago)
Northern irelands political establishment set in beautiful park atmosphere lots to do and see
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