Stormont Castle is a mansion in east Belfast which is used as the main meeting place of the Northern Ireland Executive. It was never a castle as such: the original building was reworked in the nineteenth century in the Scottish baronial style with features such as bartizans used for decorative purposes.

Between 1921 and 1972, it served as the official residence of the Prime Minister of Northern Ireland. However, a number of prime ministers chose to live at Stormont House, the official residence of the Speaker of the House of Commons of Northern Ireland, which was empty as a number of speakers had chosen to live in their own homes. It also served as the location of the Cabinet Room of the Government of Northern Ireland from 1921 to 1972.

Before devolution it served as the Belfast headquarters of the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, Northern Ireland Office Ministers and supporting officials. During the Troubles, it was also used by MI5 officers.

The castle is open to the public each year on the European Heritage Open Day weekend.

References:
  • Wikipedia

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Founded: 1830
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

gavin murray (10 months ago)
Not open to the public
Trần Trung Nguyễn (2 years ago)
Amazing castle!
A Z (3 years ago)
Wonderful free tour. Enjoyed refreshments. Great space outside to relax or exercise.
alan stewart (3 years ago)
Ist time to visit this iconic place. Beautiful interior no expense spared. Interesting to see the 1st minister and deputy minister's office. Also enjoyed the lovely grounds.
Montgomery Hemingway (3 years ago)
Scots baronial house. Liked the old groundskeepers cottages at the back of the greenhouse
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