Antrim Castle Gardens

Antrim, United Kingdom

Antrim Castle was erected in stages between 1613 and 1662. It was destroyed by fire in 1922 and finally demolished in the 1970s. All that remain are a slightly raised grassed platform as well as a freestanding Italian stair tower which was built in 1887 and a gatehouse, which was built around 1818 with twin neo-Tudor towers, with older connecting walls.

The gardens, originally dating from the 17th-century, are a popular tourist attraction. Jacobean-Revival outbuildings of coursed rubble basalt with sandstone dressings were built about 1840. The entrance gateway to the demesne has octagonal turrets. The stable block was later converted for use as a family residence and renamed Clotworthy House. This was acquired by Antrim Borough Council and converted for use as an Arts Centre in 1992.

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    Details

    Founded: 1613
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    More Information

    en.wikipedia.org

    Rating

    4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    Sean Reel (12 months ago)
    Lovely spot, very busy for a school day as a lot of groups were there for different activities.. well maintained grounds and we had a lovely picnic down at the lough shore
    Des Campbell (12 months ago)
    All loved this place since I used to play here as a child. It's lost a lot of its "wildness" as it seemed to me then but it is now a well kept urban park. Photo opportunities everywhere you look. I always tie in a walk here via reas wood the marina them along the river and across the old bridge.
    angela woods (12 months ago)
    Absolutely beautiful. Great place for walks. Cafe in the grounds worth a visit. Food excellent. Will go there again.
    Liam Mulholland (12 months ago)
    Amazingly kept gardens and walks. With a resident heron and plenty of squirrels, it's a great place to take the kids for a nature walk. Great for dogs too.
    Tracey O'NEILL (13 months ago)
    Beautiful place to walk round and great for anyone with disabilities, the cafe is lovely too. A lady who worked there with dark hair and glasses and was foreign, she was so friendly and caring I was waiting for the toilet (I need a stick to walk) she was there right away telling me she had s key for the disabled toilet and she was lovely. I know that might not mean much to some people but it did to me because somehow you become invisible when you have a disability. Well done to all staff. The artist was a lovely lady too.
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