Annadorn dolmen has a large, low, slightly displaced capstone about 65 cm thick covering a rectangular chamber and supported by three stones about 60 cm high. An account of 1802 suggests that it was formerly set beneath a large rectangular cairn 60 ft in diameter and approached by a lintelled passage, so it could be the remains of a passage grave.

Another possible explanation could be that the supporting stones were originally upright supporting the capstone, representing a more typical tripod dolmen. The monument has not been excavated and closer examination would be required to correctly interpret the site. The capstone has many small solution pits on the upper surface, two of which appear to have been enlarged. The 1802 account also says the chamber under the capstone contained ashes and a number of bones.

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Founded: Prehistoric
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

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4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

tom reid (7 months ago)
Amazing look back to 4500 years, to the history of our week country.
Paddy_ RR (2 years ago)
Not much to see unfortunately and the previously mentioned information boards have been removed but the Dolmen is in good condition (all things considered) and the views of the surrounding countryside are quite good.
Patricia O'Neill (2 years ago)
Easy to access though not wheelchair friendly.
Paul Smyth (3 years ago)
It is good to go sit by your self someone's nice to do it
Michael McKelvey (3 years ago)
Beautiful out of the way lovely place
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