Annadorn dolmen has a large, low, slightly displaced capstone about 65 cm thick covering a rectangular chamber and supported by three stones about 60 cm high. An account of 1802 suggests that it was formerly set beneath a large rectangular cairn 60 ft in diameter and approached by a lintelled passage, so it could be the remains of a passage grave.

Another possible explanation could be that the supporting stones were originally upright supporting the capstone, representing a more typical tripod dolmen. The monument has not been excavated and closer examination would be required to correctly interpret the site. The capstone has many small solution pits on the upper surface, two of which appear to have been enlarged. The 1802 account also says the chamber under the capstone contained ashes and a number of bones.

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Founded: Prehistoric
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

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3.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Alex Overend (18 months ago)
It's a rock like
松永裕己 (2 years ago)
Mark Killen (3 years ago)
Josette Fitzpatrick (3 years ago)
Beautiful
Dne Murray (3 years ago)
Don't let the poor signage deter you from a visit to this Dolmen. It is where Google says it is - in the corner of the road, on the turning to Annadorn from the main Loughinisland Road. As with a lot of similar sites in Northern Ireland, expect zero parking facilities etc.
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