The Giant's Ring is a henge monument at Ballynahatty, near Shaw's Bridge, Belfast. It dates from the Neolithic period and was built around 2700 BCE. It is near the Shaw's Bridge crossing of the River Lagan, a point which has been used as a crossing of the river since at least the Stone Age. The original purpose of the monument was most likely as a meeting place or as a memorial to the dead.

The site consists of a circular enclosure, 180 m in diameter and 2.8 hectares in area, surrounded by a circular earthwork bank 3.5m high. At least three of the five irregularly spaced gaps in the bank are intentional and possibly original. East of the centre of the enclosure is a small passage tomb with a vestigial passage facing west. There were reports of other tombs outside the enclosure, but there is no trace of these.

References:

Comments

Your name

Website (optional)



Details

Founded: 2700 BCE
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in United Kingdom

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Gerry Avery (16 months ago)
This is a lovely spot, well cared for, interesting in itself and surrounded by walks in beautiful countryside. It is hard to believe this is so close to the city centre yet one is plunged into deepest countryside as you walk down to the Lagan at Minnowburn. The paths are very good, well done all the volunteers who maintain them.
chris graham (17 months ago)
Went to the giants ring as a meet up point for the Belfast Bee association. I took the opportunity to have a look at the ring. It was really peaceful, deep in the awe inspiring country, yet within easy reach of Belfast. The only fly in the ointment is someone decided to put the giants ring, slap bang on final approach to Belfast airport. Would recommend especially if you take in the National Trust garden's, just down the road.
Ali Steele (17 months ago)
Worth a visit on a sunny day. Plenty of walking trails nearby and car parking is available right next to the ring.
Michael McKelvey (18 months ago)
Fascinating place, whose origins are still mysterious, could be better signposted
Ruth Kerr (19 months ago)
Lovely for a family walk and for dog walkers as well.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kisimul Castle

Dating from the 15th century, Kisimul is the only significant surviving medieval castle in the Outer Hebrides. It was the residence of the chief of the Macneils of Barra, who claimed descent from the legendary Niall of the Nine Hostages. Tradition tells of the Macneils settling in Barra in the 11th century, but it was only in 1427 that Gilleonan Macneil comes on record as the first lord. He probably built the castle that dominates the rocky islet, and in its shadow a crew house for his personal galley and crew. The sea coursed through Macneil veins, and a descendant, Ruari ‘the Turbulent’, was arrested for piracy of an English ship during King James VI’s reign in the later 16th century.

Heavy debts eventually forced the Macneil chiefs to sell Barra in 1838. However, a descendant, Robert Lister Macneil, the 45th Chief, repurchased the estate in 1937, and set about restoring his ancestral seat. It passed into Historic Scotland’s care in 2000.

The castle dates essentially from the 15th century. It takes the form of a three-storey tower house. This formed the residence of the clan chief. An associated curtain wall fringed the small rock on which the castle stood, and enclosed a small courtyard in which there are ancillary buildings. These comprised a feasting hall, a chapel, a tanist’s house and a watchman’s house. Most were restored in the 20th century, the tanist’s house serving as the family home of the Macneils. A well near the postern gate is fed with fresh water from an underground seam. Outside the curtain wall, beside the original landing-place, are the foundations of the crew house, where the sailors manning their chief’s galley had their quarters.