A priory was first established on the site of Tournay Abbey in the 11th century, which became an abbey in the 17th century. It was suppressed during the French Revolution. A new abbey was founded in the 1930s in Madiran and was transferred to Tournay in 1952, the year after construction of a new monastery. The building was completed in 1958. The abbey remains active and houses a community of approximately 20 monks.

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Artigueher, Tournay, France
See all sites in Tournay

Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in France
Historical period: Birth of Capetian dynasty (France)

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Michael “Shika” ST (7 months ago)
Bewitching and shop full of, binne things.
Chrystelle le minoux (9 months ago)
very good fruit jellies, perfect shipping and the satisfaction of also doing a good deed for the abbey, I recommend
ᴇxᴏᴠᴀʀɢ (21 months ago)
Tournay Abbey (French: Abbaye Notre-Dame de Tournay) is an active Benedictine monastery in Tournay, Hautes-Pyrénées, France. A priory was first established on the site in the 11th century, which became an abbey in the 17th century. It was suppressed during the French Revolution. A new abbey was founded in the 1930s in Madiranand was transferred to Tournay in 1952, the year after construction of a new monastery. The building was completed in 1958. The abbey remains active and houses a community of approximately 20 monks (Such biblical place)
Sarah Chevreau (23 months ago)
Superb abbey which is worth a look. The calm that reigns there is so soothing. We came for the shop, too bad, it was closed ...
Marie Consiglio (3 years ago)
L'accueil,la sérénité,les offices de ce lieu m'ont comblée.
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