Samtavro Monastery

Mtskheta, Georgia

Samtavro Transfiguration Orthodox Church and Nunnery of St. Nino in Mtskheta, Georgia, were built in the 4th century by King Mirian III of Iberia. The church was reconstructed in the 11th century by King George I and Catholicos-Patriarch Melkisedek. The famous Georgian Saint monk Gabriel is buried in the yard of Samtavro Church.

Samtavro is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Historical Monuments of Mtskheta.

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 11th century
Category: Religious sites in Georgia

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

RuRu Delux (2 years ago)
Great place realy loved it
Mr Krúdy (2 years ago)
Beautiful lovely frescoes and set in a beautiful picturesque place well worth a visit
Tamara alibegashvili (2 years ago)
A very important and interesting historical place for Georgia. If you ar fond of old beautiful churches, don't hesitate to visit it
shwan eng (2 years ago)
i visited it in 2013 Samtavro is an Orthodox Christian monastery complex that combines Samtavro Transfiguration Church and Nunnery of St. Nino in Mtskheta, Georgia. Built presumably in the 4th century by the King Mirian III, and reconstructed in the 11th century by the King George I and Catholicos-Patriarch Melchizedek I, Samtavro is an important Early and High Medieval historical and architectural monument, protected by UNESCO. Samtavro church is cross-in-square temple, with archature [sic?] and other decorations typical for the 11th century Georgian architecture. The famous Georgian Saint monk Gabriel is buried in the yard of Samtavro Church.
Dan (2 years ago)
Pleasant place with a local market just by it. With ashort walk you can find all short of souvenirs and typical food and sweets
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Redipuglia World War I Memorial

Redipuglia is the largest Italian Military Sacrarium. It rises up on the western front of the Monte Sei Busi, which, in the First World War was bitterly fought after because, although it was not very high, from its summit it allowed an ample range of access from the West to the first steps of the Karstic table area.

The monumental staircase on which the remains of one hundred thousand fallen soldiers are lined up and which has at its base the monolith of the Duke of Aosta, who was the commanding officer of the third Brigade, and gives an image of a military grouping in the field of a Great Unity with its Commanding Officer at the front. The mortal remains of 100,187 fallen soldiers lie here, 39,857 of them identified and 60,330 unknown.