San Esteban de Gormaz Castle

San Esteban de Gormaz, Spain

The castle of San Esteban de Gormaz is one of the key castles that changed ruler once and again during the 10th and 11th century when it finally came under Christian domain. During the reign of King García I, king of Leon, it was reinforced giving place to a repopulation of the town. From there, soldiers would control transit through the Douro River and they would guard the bridge that passed over this river. Nowadays, what is left of the castle is a large wall that is about two metres thick. The castle was built with ashlar stonework, possibly of Roman origin.

Near the access gate, there is a great opening in the ground known as Pozo Lairón, although is not certain what it was used for. The castle is narrow and elongated, and inside there are remains of water pools and underground constructions. Although it is quite deteriorated, it is of great importance due to its strategical location from which you can see the castle of Gormaz.

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Details

Founded: 10th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

www.sorianitelaimaginas.com

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Celia (3 years ago)
Preciosas vistas
Angel Sl (4 years ago)
Fantásticas vistas. Merece la pena subir.
Salvador Rosillo (4 years ago)
Altamente recomendable. La llamada puerta de castilla nos otorga un espectáculo visual de los 15 km a la redonda.
Jorge Martinez Quiroga (4 years ago)
El castillo de San Esteban de Gormaz, construido en el siglo X perteneció a distintos bandos durante los siglos X y XI ya que por su ubicación estratégica controlaba el paso por el Duero. Cuando finalmente en el siglo XI queda definitivamente en manos cristianas se repuebla la zona. En los últimos años partes de los restos del castillo fueron derribados para evita desprendimientos.
Borja Monge (4 years ago)
Excelente enclave histórico donde ver todo el pueblo y esta parte de la Ribera
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