Urueña Castle

Urueña, Spain

The Urueña castle was built around the year 1060 by the Castilian monarch Fernando I el Magno (the Great). It is built on the remains of a Roman fort. Overlooking the Tierra de Campos it has always been a strategically important place. Urueña was on the border between the two kingdoms Castilla and León. After many battles the kingdom of Castilla reconquered the castle in the year 1281.

The Queen Doña Urraca lived in this castle. Also Doña María de Padilla, mistress of King Pedro I of Castilla, lived here. Later the castle was used as a prison: Doña Beatriz Princess of Portugal was held here as one of the prisoners. From the 19th century it was used as a cemetery. Today only the exterior walls of the castle remain.

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1060
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pedro Francisco (2 years ago)
Experiencia agradable, muy apto para niños aunque los mayores también disfrutan. Gran exposición
MIGUEL A SÁNCHEZ (2 years ago)
Bonito pueblo Urueña, conocido como el pueblo del libro. Fue un acierto incluirlo en la ruta por Castilla y León, merece la pena desviarse y conocerlo, para poder perderse entre sus murallas. El castillo estaba cerrado y no ponía ningún horario de apertura, una pena esa falta de información.
Jorge Sanz (2 years ago)
Castillo en bastantes buenas condiciones. Ubicado en Urueña, un pueblo inscrito en los “pueblos más bonitos de España”, de forma merecida. Sus iglesias, corros (plazas), su muralla en muy buenas condiciones o su título desde hace 11 años como primera villa del libro de España. Sus murallas de una altura remarcable llama la atención especialmente.
Andrea ea (2 years ago)
La villa del libro de Urueña es un pueblo precioso, merece la pena visitarlo, no solo por sus librerías para los amantes de la lectura, sino por las vistas de los campos de Castilla que rodean al pueblo. Es un lugar único en el que merece la pena parar aunque sea para una visita rápida.
jesus manuel sancho (2 years ago)
Un pueblo muy bonito , las librerías merecen la pena , la muralla impresionante; el entorno es nuestra "ANCHA ES CASTILLA" conviene reservar para comer esta vez nos toco en la barra por falta de previsión. pero sin problemas ,
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Kirkjubøargarður

Kirkjubøargarður ('Yard of Kirkjubøur', also known as King"s Farm) is one of the oldest still inhabited wooden houses of the world. The farm itself has always been the largest in the Faroe Islands. The old farmhouse dates back to the 11th century. It was the episcopal residence and seminary of the Diocese of the Faroe Islands, from about 1100. Sverre I of Norway (1151–1202), grew up here and went to the priest school. The legend says, that the wood for the block houses came as driftwood from Norway and was accurately bundled and numbered, just for being set up. Note, that there is no forest in the Faroes and wood is a very valuable material. Many such wood legends are thus to be found in Faroese history.

The oldest part is a so-called roykstova (reek parlour, or smoke room). Perhaps it was moved one day, because it does not fit to its foundation. Another ancient room is the loftstovan (loft room). It is supposed that Bishop Erlendur wrote the 'Sheep Letter' here in 1298. This is the earliest document of the Faroes we know today. It is the statute concerning sheep breeding on the Faroes. Today the room is the farm"s library. The stórastovan (large room) is from a much later date, being built in 1772.

Though the farmhouse is a museum, the 17th generation of the Patursson Family, which has occupied it since 1550, is still living here. Shortly after the Reformation in the Faroe Islands in 1538, all the real estate of the Catholic Church was seized by the King of Denmark. This was about half of the land in the Faroes, and since then called King"s Land (kongsjørð). The largest piece of King"s Land was the farm in Kirkjubøur due to the above-mentioned Episcopal residence. This land is today owned by the Faroese government, and the Paturssons are tenants from generation to generation. It is always the oldest son, who becomes King"s Farmer, and in contrast to the privately owned land, the King"s Land is never divided between the sons.

The farm holds sheep, cattle and some horses. It is possible to get a coffee here and buy fresh mutton and beef directly from the farmer. In the winter season there is also hare hunting for the locals. Groups can rent the roykstovan for festivities and will be served original Faroese cuisine.

Other famous buildings directly by the farmhouse are the Magnus Cathedral and the Saint Olav"s Church, which also date back to the mediaeval period. All three together represent the Faroe Island"s most interesting historical site.