Urueña Castle

Urueña, Spain

The Urueña castle was built around the year 1060 by the Castilian monarch Fernando I el Magno (the Great). It is built on the remains of a Roman fort. Overlooking the Tierra de Campos it has always been a strategically important place. Urueña was on the border between the two kingdoms Castilla and León. After many battles the kingdom of Castilla reconquered the castle in the year 1281.

The Queen Doña Urraca lived in this castle. Also Doña María de Padilla, mistress of King Pedro I of Castilla, lived here. Later the castle was used as a prison: Doña Beatriz Princess of Portugal was held here as one of the prisoners. From the 19th century it was used as a cemetery. Today only the exterior walls of the castle remain.

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Details

Founded: 1060
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Pedro Francisco (18 months ago)
Experiencia agradable, muy apto para niños aunque los mayores también disfrutan. Gran exposición
MIGUEL A SÁNCHEZ (19 months ago)
Bonito pueblo Urueña, conocido como el pueblo del libro. Fue un acierto incluirlo en la ruta por Castilla y León, merece la pena desviarse y conocerlo, para poder perderse entre sus murallas. El castillo estaba cerrado y no ponía ningún horario de apertura, una pena esa falta de información.
Jorge Sanz (19 months ago)
Castillo en bastantes buenas condiciones. Ubicado en Urueña, un pueblo inscrito en los “pueblos más bonitos de España”, de forma merecida. Sus iglesias, corros (plazas), su muralla en muy buenas condiciones o su título desde hace 11 años como primera villa del libro de España. Sus murallas de una altura remarcable llama la atención especialmente.
Andrea ea (19 months ago)
La villa del libro de Urueña es un pueblo precioso, merece la pena visitarlo, no solo por sus librerías para los amantes de la lectura, sino por las vistas de los campos de Castilla que rodean al pueblo. Es un lugar único en el que merece la pena parar aunque sea para una visita rápida.
jesus manuel sancho (20 months ago)
Un pueblo muy bonito , las librerías merecen la pena , la muralla impresionante; el entorno es nuestra "ANCHA ES CASTILLA" conviene reservar para comer esta vez nos toco en la barra por falta de previsión. pero sin problemas ,
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