Royal Palace of Valladolid

Valladolid, Spain

The Royal Palace of Valladolid was the official residence of the Kings of Spain during the period in which the Royal Court had its seat in Valladolid between 1601 and 1606, and a temporary residence of the Spanish Monarchs from Charles I to Isabella II, as well as of Napoleon during the War of the Independence. Currently is the headquarters of the 4th General Sub-inspection of the Army.

Despite the fact that kings were present in Valladolid often, they lacked an official residence until the 17th century. When the Royal Court moved to the city, the palace of Francisco de Cobos fulfilled that function. Francisco de los Cobos was a Secretary of State under Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor (King Charles I of Spain). Born in Úbeda, De the Cobos forged a spectacular political career. He married in 1522 with María de Mendoza, daughter of the Counts of Ribadavia, achieving thus the nobility rank that he lacked. De los Cobos built his palace nearby his in-laws (Palace of the Counts of Ribadavia) and next to St. Paul's Church, according to a 1524 project of royal architect Luis de Vega. The building was built around a magnificent, Renaissance-styled courtyard. Charles V later ordered its extension, resulting in a building of complicated compositions like several courtyards, chapel and state rooms.

Since the 19th century the takes in the General Captaincy of the 7th Military Region (currently the 4th General Sub-inspection) of the Army. At the beginning of the 20th century significant renovations are made, to arrive at the present with numerous structural changes to its original design.

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Details

Founded: 1601
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jose Luis Jimeno (3 months ago)
Es un edificio en el q se respira historia
Juan Carlos Herreras Cantalapiedra (3 months ago)
Interesante como lugar histórico. Amena la sala del General Veguillas
Daniel Ramil (3 months ago)
Una pena que los distintos usos que se le han dado al antiguo Palacio Real de la corte de Felipe III hayan desvirtuado tanto el edificio.
Tere Gar (4 months ago)
Sorprendida. Una muy grata experiencia, una visita guiada muy bien explicada que nos ayudó a entender el Valladolid del pasado. Muy recomendable.
Mª Jesús López Piedrahita (4 months ago)
Me encanta las exposiciones que ponen. Muchas gracias
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