Convento de Santa Dorotea

Burgos, Spain

The Convento de Santa Dorotea is an Augustinian nun's convent in Burgos. It is a Gothic construction, and dates back to 1387, when Dorotea Rodriguez Valderrama, along with other devout women formed a nun's community at the old church of Santa Maria la Blanca. The community adopted the rule of St. Augustine in 1429 with the support of Bishop Pablo de Santamaría. In 1457 they moved to the church of San Andrés, until in 1470 they settled in the current location in the barrio of San Pedro y San Felices. Among the many benefactors who favored the monastery was King John II of Castile. Tombs of note include those of Alonso de Ortega (died 1501), and Bishop Juan de Ortega, the work of Nicholas de Vergara, 1516.

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Founded: 1387
Category: Religious sites in Spain

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en.wikipedia.org

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BUJI (3 years ago)
Miriam Sedano Elvira (3 years ago)
Pequeña y modesta iglesia anexa al monasterio de clausura de las Doroteas, en la calle del mismo nombre
luis ignacio santamaria (3 years ago)
Curiosa
keñrica Morrison (3 years ago)
Genial
Fernando Escobedo Cardeñoso (3 years ago)
El monasterio de madres agustinas canónigas de Santa Dorotea contiene los sepulcros de la familia del obispo D. Juan de Ortega.
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