Temple of Neptune

Poreč, Croatia

The Temple of Neptune was erected on the Poreč forum in the 1st century. It is thought to be the biggest in Istria, although only a portion of its walls and the foundations have been preserved.

During the Antiquity, Poreč as well as all Roman towns, had a forum, the main town square known today as Marafor, and a Capitoline temple facing it. It was believed that the temple was dedicated to God Mars in light of interpreting the Marafor as the Martis forum i.e. the forum of Mars. To the north-west, also in the near vicinity of the former forum, are the remains of the Large Temple dedicated to Neptune, the god of the sea. There are some who interpret the remains as a holy ground surrounding the Capitoline from three sides. The temple, dated to the 1st century, is the biggest in Istria in spite of only a portion of its wall and foundations being preserved.

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Details

Founded: 0-100 AD
Category: Prehistoric and archaeological sites in Croatia

More Information

www.istria-culture.com

Rating

4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Marianne Oostenrijk (2 years ago)
Je moet weten dat het er zit. Men loopt er zo voorbij. We waren letterlijk de enige op het plekje. Een mooie plek met ruïnes van meer dan 2000 jaar oud, uitkijkend op de zee op het uiterste puntje van Porec. Niet omgeven door barretjes of commercieel uitgebaat. De toegang is gratis.
James Green (2 years ago)
A peaceful spot near the end of the peninsula that Porec sits on. 2,000 year old ruins of the ancient temple of Neptune. No crowds bar a few cats. You can soak in the sense of history of the place along with the warm Istrian sun. Great spot to think, relax and enjoy. No entry fees, you just need to find the spot.
Wavy Lai (3 years ago)
lovely shopping street.
Emiel Suilen (3 years ago)
A shame it is neglected. No information, grass everywhere. Churches are repaired, but this once-holy place is left to rot.
Dariusz Jędrzejczyk (4 years ago)
2000 years of history had been waiting for me just around the corner. Not too much to see but very near of crowded street. You can find here one minut of silence. Worth to visit if you are walking by.
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