The first surviving document, which mentions the Lords of Heidegg, dates from 1185. For many centuries feudal Heidegg Castle, built in the 12th and 13th centuries was their home. Century. Today it houses the history and culture center of the Seetal valley. A living museum in which you learn stories and customs of aristocratic families, with the spirit of the past further rekindled with a stroll in the large park with its beautiful rose garden.

The castle complex with its tower, chapel and residential buildings is surrounded by lush forests and idyllic vineyards. Starting at the famous rose gardens, visitors can explore the park on romantic paths and discover its chestnut-lined boulevards, rest areas and the 'Tobelweg'. The castle tower holds the oldest living quarters in Canton Lucerne. Exhibitions and hands-on attractions for young and old alike ensure that visitors experience Heidegg Castle and its history in unique and often surprising ways.

Built during the Middle Ages, the foundations of the modern castle tower might originally have served as the castle's palas, which by 1237 had been expanded into a fortified tower by of the Lords of Heidegg. During the Late Middle Ages the tower was remodelled into a more comfortable castle. After the decline of the Heidegg and Büsiger families the castle was taken over by Lucerne's patricians, who had gained their wealth through trade and foreign military service. The Pfyffer family further reconstructed the tower in a Baroque but still fairly historicist style, inspired by medieval architecture. During the 18th century the city of Lucerne acquired Heidegg Castle, which was later turned over to the canton. A distinctly aristocratic lifestyle was once again celebrated within the castle walls when the Pfyffer von Heidegg family once again moved in in 1875. However, when the last member of the family left it to the canton in 1950, the tower was turned into a museum. Since the last renovations that took place from 1995 to 1998 the Foundation Pro Heidegg has been in charge of running and maintaining the castle and park.

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Founded: 13th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Demeter Jurista (15 months ago)
Nice place for family trip
Giuseppe Scozzaro (2 years ago)
Very very good....
Susan Fehr (2 years ago)
Very nice castle, some interesting exhibitions and a good kids play area. Sadly the cafe is very small and is quickly overrun.
Adrian Sandmeier (2 years ago)
Awesome for kids. Lot's of possibilities to play and learn.
Tim Purtell (2 years ago)
Great place for families with amazing views of the local lake and mountains and grape vines below. It’s a great place for kids with the top floor having a whole lot of gym mats, a giant pillow fight room and a massive pinball rollercoaster! FYI you need to be able to walk up 5 flights of stairs.
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