The first surviving document, which mentions the Lords of Heidegg, dates from 1185. For many centuries feudal Heidegg Castle, built in the 12th and 13th centuries was their home. Century. Today it houses the history and culture center of the Seetal valley. A living museum in which you learn stories and customs of aristocratic families, with the spirit of the past further rekindled with a stroll in the large park with its beautiful rose garden.

The castle complex with its tower, chapel and residential buildings is surrounded by lush forests and idyllic vineyards. Starting at the famous rose gardens, visitors can explore the park on romantic paths and discover its chestnut-lined boulevards, rest areas and the 'Tobelweg'. The castle tower holds the oldest living quarters in Canton Lucerne. Exhibitions and hands-on attractions for young and old alike ensure that visitors experience Heidegg Castle and its history in unique and often surprising ways.

Built during the Middle Ages, the foundations of the modern castle tower might originally have served as the castle's palas, which by 1237 had been expanded into a fortified tower by of the Lords of Heidegg. During the Late Middle Ages the tower was remodelled into a more comfortable castle. After the decline of the Heidegg and Büsiger families the castle was taken over by Lucerne's patricians, who had gained their wealth through trade and foreign military service. The Pfyffer family further reconstructed the tower in a Baroque but still fairly historicist style, inspired by medieval architecture. During the 18th century the city of Lucerne acquired Heidegg Castle, which was later turned over to the canton. A distinctly aristocratic lifestyle was once again celebrated within the castle walls when the Pfyffer von Heidegg family once again moved in in 1875. However, when the last member of the family left it to the canton in 1950, the tower was turned into a museum. Since the last renovations that took place from 1995 to 1998 the Foundation Pro Heidegg has been in charge of running and maintaining the castle and park.

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The moated castle at Beersel is one of the few exceptionally well-preserved examples of medieval fortifications in Belgium. It remains pretty much as it must have appeared in the 15th century. Remarkably, it was never converted into a fortified mansion. A visitor is able to experience at first-hand how it must have felt to live in a heavily fortified castle in the Middle Ages.

The castle was built in around 1420 as a means of defence on the outer reaches of Brussels. The tall, dense walls and towers were intended to hold any besiegers at bay. The moat and the marshy ground along its eastern, southern and western edges made any attack a formidable proposition. For that reason, any attackers would have chosen its weaker northern defences where the castle adjoins higher lying ground. But the castle was only taken and destroyed on one occasion in 1489, by the inhabitants of Brussels who were in rebellion against Maximilian of Austria.

After being stormed and plundered by the rebels it was partially rebuilt. The pointed roofs and stepped gables are features which have survived this period. The reconstruction explains why two periods can be identified in the fabric of the edifice, particularly on the outside.

The red Brabant sandstone surrounds of the embrasures, now more or less all bricked up, are characteristic of the 15th century. The other embrasures, edged with white sandstone, date from the end of the 15th century. They were intended for setting up the artillery fire. The merlons too are in white sandstone. The year 1617 can be clearly seen in the foundation support on the first tower. This refers to restorations carried out at the time by the Arenberg family.

Nowadays, the castle is dominated by three massive towers. The means of defence follow the classic pattern: a wide, deep moat surrounding the castle, a drawbridge, merlons on the towers, embrasures in the walls and in the towers, at more or less regular intervals, and machiolations. Circular, projecting towers ensured that attacks from the side could be thwarted. If the enemy were to penetrate the outer wall, each tower could be defended from embrasures facing onto the inner courtyard.

The second and third towers are flanked by watchtowers from which shots could be fired directly below. Between the second and third tower are two openings in the walkway on the wall. It is not clear what these were used for. Were these holes used for the disposing of rubbish, or escape routes. The windows on the exterior are narrow and low. All light entering comes from the interior. The few larger windows on the exterior date from a later period. It is most probable that the third tower - the highest - was used as a watchtower.