The Fortress of Bashtovë is a medieval quadrangular fortress located on a fertile flat ground east of the mouth of the Shkumbin River. 

Previously in the Middle Ages, the region of Boshtovë was known as a trade harbor and otherwise centre for the export of grains. The origin of the fortress has been for some time a matter of dispute among historians. The initial fortress was constructed during the time when the region was part of the Venetian Empire as according to Gjerak Karaiskaj. However, Alain Ducellier has asserted that the Venetians have built over an existing former structure, which dates back to the 6th century, when the area was under the Byzantine Empire during the Justinian dynasty.

The fortress is a rectangular structure oriented to the north-south direction. There are three entrances, from which there still are well-preserved archaeological traces they were placed at the northern, western and eastern walls. The walls are 9 metres high and comprise a roughly 60 by 90 metres interior. In the north and east, there stands round towers each of them 12 metres high.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Besim Xhaja (9 months ago)
Historic castle. If you are in Tirana or near Durres or Kavaja you should visit it !
hector jammara (14 months ago)
The only castle build in the field make Bashtova castle unique and very atracting. Build by Venetians(for comercial use) in the bank of Shkumbin river make it's a very unique due to it's approximity of Adriatik sea. Recognized as Monument of Culture by Ministry of Culture of Albania it's well conserved and maintained and also opened for the wide public and tourists.
Klodian Hajdari (2 years ago)
The only field castle ik albania, is beautiful and have a frate nature view around
Sanna Kullenmark (2 years ago)
Serene nice fortress. Reached by car. Could use an information sign as we wanted to know more about it.
Julio Lamas (2 years ago)
Fantastic location! I don’t know any other way to get there by car but it was worth the visit. A couple people stopped by while we were visiting and a local told us that the location was actually a trade post on the secondary road of the Via Egnatia!
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