Bashtovë Fortress

Vilë-Boshtovë, Albania

The Fortress of Bashtovë is a medieval quadrangular fortress located on a fertile flat ground east of the mouth of the Shkumbin River. 

Previously in the Middle Ages, the region of Boshtovë was known as a trade harbor and otherwise centre for the export of grains. The origin of the fortress has been for some time a matter of dispute among historians. The initial fortress was constructed during the time when the region was part of the Venetian Empire as according to Gjerak Karaiskaj. However, Alain Ducellier has asserted that the Venetians have built over an existing former structure, which dates back to the 6th century, when the area was under the Byzantine Empire during the Justinian dynasty.

The fortress is a rectangular structure oriented to the north-south direction. There are three entrances, from which there still are well-preserved archaeological traces they were placed at the northern, western and eastern walls. The walls are 9 metres high and comprise a roughly 60 by 90 metres interior. In the north and east, there stands round towers each of them 12 metres high.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Hubert (2 years ago)
Sad it was not allowed to get in on a normal working day, but the castle is nice.
Granit Vladi (3 years ago)
It’s really nice fortress, you can visit the fortress and visit the beach at the same time
Ngwmusic (3 years ago)
So cool, just a castle sitting in a field. Easy to find. There is no entrance fee, you just walk in and explore.
Bes Alija (3 years ago)
Forttres of Bashtova, near adriatic sea, Kavaja, Albana
Kristi Rapi (3 years ago)
Is very good place , i will visit it very soon
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