Basilica of Saint Michael Ruins

Durrës, Albania

The Basilica of Saint Michael is an early Palaeo-Christian church which is believed to date to the 5th or 6th century. A mosaic unearthed in the basilica also demonstrates how ingrained Christian culture later was with the early Byzantine Empire.

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Address

SH85, Durrës, Albania
See all sites in Durrës

Details

Founded: 5th century AD
Category: Religious sites in Albania

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

3.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

albion jerasi (2 years ago)
Konstantinos Giakoumis (2 years ago)
This is the biggest early Christian basilica in Albania, with exquiste mosaic decoration, built in the 6th century, burnt is the course of the Normal operations in the region, in the course of the 11th century, still in use until the 14th century. A monument from which a beautiful view to Durrês' seashore, at least what is left to be viewed, is opened.
Antonela Maksuti (3 years ago)
Great Koyot (4 years ago)
There is Nothing left here... only few bricks and goats!
Great Koyot (4 years ago)
There is Nothing left here... only few bricks and goats!
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