Padernello Castle

Padernello, Italy

The imposing residential castle of Padernello was built between the 15th and 16th centuries by the noble Martinengo family.

Surrounded by countryside, in between fields, with a moat that protected it from assaults and various dangers, it is the noble element of a splendid rural village, with its large, elegant internal courtyards.

Old houses-workshops with their traditional entrances can still be seen in the village centre. One inn and two traditional trattorias have revived the old village and offer yet another reason to visit this lovely place.

A very popular event is Mercato della Terra (Earth’s Market), a farmers’ market organised by Slow Food every third Sunday of the month in the centre. After buying produce from small organic producers, everyone eats together in an atmosphere of heartfelt conviviality.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

More Information

www.bresciatourism.it

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Giuseppe Valastro (2 years ago)
Esperienza bellissima. Un piccolo tesoro, una volta dimenticato, riportato in auge da meravigliosi volontari e da un donatore, che ha riammobiliato l'interno. La guida era colta e gentile. Abbiamo passato una parentesi indimenticabile. Non andate quando piove, bisogna lasciare la macchina distante.
fiumy kant (2 years ago)
Molto bello il castello, ben tenuto e restaurato visto i danni che ha subito in passato. La guida veramente preparata e sul pezzo. Tutti molto cordiali. In Italia abbiamo delle perle di castelli, sosteniamoli andando a visitarli perché a volte si va all estero e si apprezzano quelli degli altri e non conosciamo delle meraviglie vicine anche a casa nostra. Andate a Padernello, non vi deluderà
Andrea Cesare (3 years ago)
Beautiful!
Roberto Battioni (3 years ago)
A really great place. One of the very few castle in Italy that still has a moat with water in it. However, the highlight come on the third Sunday of every month, when a Slow Food sponsored market is held. Amazing products can be bought; cured meat, wonderful breads, great cheeses, some of the best chicken, 180 days, I had in a long time (you'll need a kitchen to cook it ) and much more. Don't miss it if you have the chance!
Paolino Pasini (3 years ago)
Romantic
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