Frascarolo Castle

Frascarolo, Italy

The Castello di Frascarolo (Frascarolo castle) or of Medici of Marignano is on the hill on a dominating position between Ganna and Ceresio valleys.

It is believed the castle is from the early Middle Ages, perhaps the work of the Longobards, but it’s only documented in 1160 when Archbishop of Milan Oberto da Pirovano upheld a valid resistance to the advancing inhabitants of Como looking to conquer the Varese area. However, it’s possible that the castle was only a rural fort back then.

Starting in the 12th century, it was the property of the Abbey of Ganna (or Abbey of San Gemolo in Ganna Valley), and followed destiny and plunders including the one by the Swiss Unterwalden from Mendrisio in 1511; it was purchased by Marquis of Marignano Gian Battista Medici in 1543. It was precisely with the advent of the noble Medici family that the castle was renovated and embellished. Over the centuries, it lost its defensive physiognomy to become a typical 16th-century residence.

The castle and its massive walls flaunt a mighty 15th-century tower with a rusticated portal, courtyard with a loggia, and an adjacent section built in the 16th century when it became an exclusive dwelling. The entrance hall preceded by a boulevard and large stretches of meadow inside certainly belong to another period.

The castle is still private property and cannot be toured without specific permission.

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Details

Founded: 12th century
Category: Castles and fortifications in Italy

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en.lagomaggiore.net

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

franco53 Forzainter53 (7 days ago)
quello che non mi è piaciuto è l'impossibilità di entrare essendo un castello abitato e privato e per il quale non si conosce gli eventuali giorni di apertura al pubblico quello che si vede da fuori è molto troppo poco
Petra Scholl-Wiere (3 months ago)
Optisch schön. Kann leider nicht besichtigt werden. Ist ein bißchen ärgerlich, wenn man dafür viele Kilometer fährt, da das Castle bei Google als Sehenswürdigkeit angepriesen wird.
Adriano Monopoli (8 months ago)
Peccato non sia visitabile, dal momento che il luogo e' privato. Comunque bel posto tranquillo. Da osservare anche la casa con affreschi e stemma Mediceo sulla facciata. Bella la passeggiata fra i boschi dei dintorni.
Egor Guffanti (9 months ago)
Do solo 2 stelle a questo maniero per i seguenti motivi. Innanzitutto è privato, non ci sono indicazioni in merito e i suoi proprietari sono restii a farlo visitare. Forse la provincia di Varese dovrebbe intervenire. Cmq sbirciando in giro ho potuto carpire un ottimo potenziale. Peccato che non sia visitabile.
Matteo Oliviero (10 months ago)
Amazing
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