San Carlo al Corso

Milan, Italy

San Carlo al Corso is a neo-classic church in the center of Milan. The church is managed by the Servite Order.

The church facade was designed in 1844 by Carlo Amati and was finished in 1847. It then served as a model for the Chiesa Rotonda in San Bernardino, Switzerland, 1867.

The complex was built to replace Convent of the Servite founded as early as 1290 and later was suppressed in 1799. The new church was built in thanks for the ending a cholera epidemic, and dedicated to Saint Charles Borromeo who was the Bishop of Milan during the time of the bubonic plague in Milan during the 16th century.

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Details

Founded: 1844
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Leonella Ferrarini (10 months ago)
Elegant and relaxing helps to dedicate to prayers and follow the celebration.
issa malki (11 months ago)
Amazing church
Jonas Jakobsen (21 months ago)
Amazing church. The details are amazing. Historically much more interesting than Doumo.
Nikolay Angelov (2 years ago)
Hidden between the buildings arround it and at the same time located in the heart in Milano, very short walkting distance from the Duomo. The church is impressive. You can take a look inside without need to wait you turn after a lot of other people
Ali Mousavi (3 years ago)
Beautiful church, huge and impressive cupola from outside, but not that impressive from inside, I didn't notice many artwork from inside the cupola.
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