Sohail Castle was built in AD 956 by Abd-ar-Rahman III to strengthen the coastal defenses. Later, in the 12th century, the Almoravids raised a defensive enclosure with an irregular floor plan, adapted to the slopes of the terrain.

In 1485 the Castillo de Sohail was occupied by the Christian armies battling against the Nasrid Kingdom of Granada. From that time the military complex underwent an inevitable process of architectural reformation which led over time to its current appearance.

Shortly after the castle lost its military function and was disposed of by public auction. The change to civilian hands initiated a period of neglect which was only interrupted in the second half of the 20th century.

In 2000 the Town of Fuengirola renovated the ruins of the castle turning it into a tourist attraction and functioning space used for concerts and other festivals. Excavated stone ruins on public display at the western base of the hill on which the castle sits are dated back to before the Roman Republic occupied Fuengirola at least 300 BC.

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Founded: 956 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

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4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Glen Seed (5 months ago)
Lovely place to go and visit Great view points.
Eva Bloor (7 months ago)
Beautiful castle with stunning views. Have to come back at night time. Would love to see the medieval market here
Robert Rowan (11 months ago)
The castle is CLOSED all summer. They only put the sign at the top of the hill...
Illya K. (15 months ago)
Very nice. You have to walk up a small hill to reach the castle. It's very easy and totally worth it. During the opening hours, the entrance inside the castle it's free! Very nice views from the inside.
Solvita Meke (16 months ago)
One of the special places in town. Loving the medieval markets and concerts in this venue. Opened for a walk and a picnic with the view over the sea all the other days. The pearl of Fuengirola.
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Angelokastro is a Byzantine castle on the island of Corfu. It is located at the top of the highest peak of the island"s shoreline in the northwest coast near Palaiokastritsa and built on particularly precipitous and rocky terrain. It stands 305 m on a steep cliff above the sea and surveys the City of Corfu and the mountains of mainland Greece to the southeast and a wide area of Corfu toward the northeast and northwest.

Angelokastro is one of the most important fortified complexes of Corfu. It was an acropolis which surveyed the region all the way to the southern Adriatic and presented a formidable strategic vantage point to the occupant of the castle.

Angelokastro formed a defensive triangle with the castles of Gardiki and Kassiopi, which covered Corfu"s defences to the south, northwest and northeast.

The castle never fell, despite frequent sieges and attempts at conquering it through the centuries, and played a decisive role in defending the island against pirate incursions and during three sieges of Corfu by the Ottomans, significantly contributing to their defeat.

During invasions it helped shelter the local peasant population. The villagers also fought against the invaders playing an active role in the defence of the castle.

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The governor of the castle (the castellan) was normally appointed by the City council of Corfu and was chosen amongst the noblemen of the island.

Angelokastro is considered one of the most imposing architectural remains in the Ionian Islands.