Álora Castle

Álora, Spain

Álora's castle was first built by the Phoenicians and subsequently expanded under Roman rule. In the 5th century the castle was destroyed by the Visigoths.

The present Álora Castle was built in the 9th century by the Moorish state of Córdoba during a campaign against the Mozarabic rebel leader Umar ibn Hafsun. Later modifications in the 10th century added two enclosures. The inner enclosure was square and used as a fortress. The outer enclosure, with several towers, covered a large area of the perimeter of the hill.

During the 17th century the parish church was built on the old mosque inside Álora Castle also using one of the castle towers. The castle was damaged by the earthquake of 1680 and since then was also used as the village cemetery. The church tower still shows several bullet holes made by a squadron of French cavalry in August 1823.

From the castle you can enjoy breathtaking views of the fertile Guadalhorce Valley and the town of Álora.

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Address

Calle Ancha 67D, Álora, Spain
See all sites in Álora

Details

Founded: 9th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Kostyantyn Prishchenko (15 months ago)
Spectacular view, great atmosphere. Old church of 15 century. And it's free
José Daniel Díaz Contreras (16 months ago)
One of the best preserved castles I in Spain dating back to the 18th century.
Carl Dolman (18 months ago)
Great views. Very well maintained and restored.
Chris Parkinson (18 months ago)
Worth a visit. Great views.
John Seligmann (20 months ago)
An excellent and free visit. The walk up from the train station is very steep, but at the top the views of the countryside and Alora are spectacular and well worth the effort. Only a few visitors during my visit which was on a Wednesday in March. In fact, there were more workers there undertaking renovations than visitors.
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