Gibralfaro Castle

Málaga, Spain

The magnificent Castillo de Gibralfaro sits on a high hill overlooking Málaga city and, and dates back to the 10th century. Gibralfaro has been the site of fortifications since the Phoenician foundation of Málaga city, circa 770 BC. The location was fortified by Calif Abd-al-Rahman III in 929 AD. While, At the beginning of the 14th century, Yusuf I of the Kingdom of Granada expanded the fortifications within the Phoenician lighthouse enclosure and erected a double wall to Alcazaba. The name is said to be derived from Arabic, Jbel, rock or mount, and Greek the word for light, Jbel-Faro, meaning 'Rock of Light'. The castle is famous for its three-month siege in 1487 by the Catholic monarchs, King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella, which ended when hunger forced the Malagueños to surrender.

The most visible remains of this historic monument are the solid ramparts which rise majestically from dense woods of pine and eucalyptus; inside the fortress itself you will find some buildings and courtyards, reminiscent of those in the Alhambra. The ramparts have been well restored and you can walk all the way round them. At one point, you can get a good view down into the La Malagueta bullring - some visitors linger for a free view of the bullfight. These walls make a fun, interesting and scenic walk, and usually you will have it to yourself, as there aren't many tourists about.

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Details

Founded: 929 AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Eric Hughes (3 months ago)
Well worth the walk to the top, this was the highlight of our day by far. What a place!
La Belgique insolite (4 months ago)
A great place with an amazing view on the beautiful city of Málaga!
Rita L (9 months ago)
Get there before 5pm!
Abdulrahman Alshebel (10 months ago)
Amazing view point
Catherine Bird (11 months ago)
Long walk up but stunning and well worth it when you reach the top. You can enter the Alcazaba and museum using card or cash.
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