San Juan Bautista Church

Málaga, Spain

Founded in 1490, the San Juan Bautista church's baroque style tower above the main entrance was added in 1770. Inside are several fine chapels and a rich altarpiece. The 17th century figure of San Juan is the work of Francisco Ortiz.

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Founded: 1490
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yonathan Stein (11 months ago)
Nice from outside and the area is also cool to have a walk.
Walking Eyes (14 months ago)
I like the view to the tower of the Church of San Juan Bautista through the Passage of Luciano Martinez. You can watch my photos on insta @walking_eyes_ and my videos on YouTube WALKING EYES
G Mc (G) (2 years ago)
This is a must, you are compelled from walking through the door to look up, it's just too much to take in, fantastic architecture galore .
Ros Williams (2 years ago)
Found this gem of a sea food resturant just by chance in Malaga on our fifth visit to the city. We loved it straight away, from the quality of the food, the atmosphere and the friendly service. Brilliant eating and drinking , sitting in a side alley in the heat of the night. Just by chance we met a family from Wales who loved the resturant too. We will be certainly visiting this resturant again next time in Malaga. Can't wait.
Lawrence Freeman (2 years ago)
A stunning church with very ornate and unusual ceiling. It also has a fabulous brick tower to the front and some marvellous side chapels.
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