San Juan Bautista Church

Málaga, Spain

Founded in 1490, the San Juan Bautista church's baroque style tower above the main entrance was added in 1770. Inside are several fine chapels and a rich altarpiece. The 17th century figure of San Juan is the work of Francisco Ortiz.

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1490
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Yonathan Stein (2 years ago)
Nice from outside and the area is also cool to have a walk.
Walking Eyes (2 years ago)
I like the view to the tower of the Church of San Juan Bautista through the Passage of Luciano Martinez. You can watch my photos on insta @walking_eyes_ and my videos on YouTube WALKING EYES
G Mc (G) (3 years ago)
This is a must, you are compelled from walking through the door to look up, it's just too much to take in, fantastic architecture galore .
Ros Williams (3 years ago)
Found this gem of a sea food resturant just by chance in Malaga on our fifth visit to the city. We loved it straight away, from the quality of the food, the atmosphere and the friendly service. Brilliant eating and drinking , sitting in a side alley in the heat of the night. Just by chance we met a family from Wales who loved the resturant too. We will be certainly visiting this resturant again next time in Malaga. Can't wait.
Lawrence Freeman (3 years ago)
A stunning church with very ornate and unusual ceiling. It also has a fabulous brick tower to the front and some marvellous side chapels.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Varberg Fortress

Varberg Fortress was built in 1287-1300 by count Jacob Nielsen as protection against his Danish king, who had declared him an outlaw after the murder of King Eric V of Denmark. Jacob had close connections with king Eric II of Norway and as a result got substantial Norwegian assistance with the construction. The fortress, as well as half the county, became Norwegian in 1305.

King Eric's grand daughter, Ingeborg Håkansdotter, inherited the area from her father, King Haakon V of Norway. She and her husband, Eric, Duke of Södermanland, established a semi-independent state out of their Norwegian, Swedish and Danish counties until the death of Erik. They spent considerable time at the fortress. Their son, King Magnus IV of Sweden (Magnus VII of Norway), spent much time at the fortress as well.

The fortress was augmented during the late 16th and early 17th century on order by King Christian IV of Denmark. However, after the Treaty of Brömsebro in 1645 the fortress became Swedish. It was used as a military installation until 1830 and as a prison from the end of the 17th Century until 1931.

It is currently used as a museum and bed and breakfast as well as private accommodation. The moat of the fortress is said to be inhabited by a small lake monster. In August 2006, a couple of witnesses claimed to have seen the monster emerge from the dark water and devour a duck. The creature is described as brown, hairless and with a 40 cm long tail.