The Plaza de toros de la Real Maestranza de Caballería de Sevilla is a 12,000-capacity bullring in Seville, Spain. During the annual Seville Fair in Seville, it is the site of one of the most well-known bullfighting festivals in the world. It is a part of the Real Maestranza de Caballería de Sevilla, a noble guild established for traditional cavalry training.

Construction began in 1749 of a circular ring on Baratillo Hill to replace the rectangular bullring that was previously located there. In 1761, the construction began to incorporate ochavas (each ochava being equivalent to four arches). The inner facade of the plaza (Palco del Príncipe) was completed in 1765. This 'box' consists of two parts: the access gate through which the successful bullfighters exit, and the theater box itself, which is reserved for the exclusive use of the Spanish Royal Family. The topmost part is composed of four arches over which is built a half-orange vault, whose topmost portion is covered by white and blue tiles. The sculptural group that concludes the composition is the work of the Portuguese sculptor Cayetano de Acosta. The Palco was built for the Infante de España, Felipe de Borbón, son of Felipe V and Isabel de Farnesio.

When Carlos III prohibited bullfighting celebrations in 1786, work on the sculptures was halted, even though only one-third of the plaza had been completed at the time. 

After 34 years the cover of the launching slips of half of the ring was finished, to the left and right of the Palco del Príncipe; being easily viewed from the cathedral and the Giralda it was reflected in a great number of stamps of the time. By 1868 the Palco de la Diputación was in such a lamentable state that Italian sculptor Augusto Franchy undertook the improvement himself, building a new area with a marble balustrade and the crest of the Real Maestranza de Caballería. The construction of five balconies to each side of the Palco de la Diputación was also added where the ring's clock is currently situated. The construction of the ring was completed in 1881; two thirds was constructed in stone, with the remainder in wood.

Between 1914 and 1915 the stone grandstands were redone in brick under the direction of Sevillian architect Aníbal González. All the rows were reconstructed with a smoother slope. Ten to twelve rows of shaded seating were constructed as well as fourteen rows in the sun and three rows of barrier. A row of armchairs were built in the superior part of the shaded area, in front of the theater boxes.

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    Founded: 1749
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    User Reviews

    Monica Rivera (15 months ago)
    Interesting venue. It’s worth the visit as the arena is amazing. Not a fan or supporter of bull spectacles but I enjoyed the visit at the site.
    Rosie Scott (2 years ago)
    Well organised and shows the history . You can even stand in the arena. Smaller than I thought it would be. Worth a visit
    Julius De Rojas (2 years ago)
    The Madison Square Garden of bullfighting. Interesting to compare with the bullring in Ronda. Sevilla focuses on the journey the bullfighters take on the day of the bullfight, as well as capturing the feel of the fight environment and crowd in paintings and relics. Ronda focuses on the historical origin of bullfighting from calvary training, with more emphasis on the spaces the horses and bulls occupy. I have a slight preference for Ronda (specifically the museum), but both places are fantastic.
    Julius de Rojas (2 years ago)
    The Madison Square Garden of bullfighting. Interesting to compare with the bullring in Ronda. Sevilla focuses on the journey the bullfighters take on the day of the bullfight, as well as capturing the feel of the fight environment and crowd in paintings and relics. Ronda focuses on the historical origin of bullfighting from calvary training, with more emphasis on the spaces the horses and bulls occupy. I have a slight preference for Ronda (specifically the museum), but both places are fantastic.
    Mirco (2 years ago)
    Plaza de toros de la Real Maestranza de Caballería de Sevilla Very interesting the tour and the story behind the fighters. With what passion and tradition they devote themselves. We recommend everyone to book this tour or let me say guided tour and be amazed. Even people who find bullfighting repulsive will still be a little impressed. To the Spain visit: We visited this area in February and got to know a completely different side of Spain through Seville and its surroundings. Seville, Cordoba, Cadiz, Ronda... it is simply everywhere very beautiful and versatile. But you should come here during the cooler season. Now in July it is very, very warm. February was ideal for excursions.
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