The Plaza de toros de la Real Maestranza de Caballería de Sevilla is a 12,000-capacity bullring in Seville, Spain. During the annual Seville Fair in Seville, it is the site of one of the most well-known bullfighting festivals in the world. It is a part of the Real Maestranza de Caballería de Sevilla, a noble guild established for traditional cavalry training.

Construction began in 1749 of a circular ring on Baratillo Hill to replace the rectangular bullring that was previously located there. In 1761, the construction began to incorporate ochavas (each ochava being equivalent to four arches). The inner facade of the plaza (Palco del Príncipe) was completed in 1765. This 'box' consists of two parts: the access gate through which the successful bullfighters exit, and the theater box itself, which is reserved for the exclusive use of the Spanish Royal Family. The topmost part is composed of four arches over which is built a half-orange vault, whose topmost portion is covered by white and blue tiles. The sculptural group that concludes the composition is the work of the Portuguese sculptor Cayetano de Acosta. The Palco was built for the Infante de España, Felipe de Borbón, son of Felipe V and Isabel de Farnesio.

When Carlos III prohibited bullfighting celebrations in 1786, work on the sculptures was halted, even though only one-third of the plaza had been completed at the time. 

After 34 years the cover of the launching slips of half of the ring was finished, to the left and right of the Palco del Príncipe; being easily viewed from the cathedral and the Giralda it was reflected in a great number of stamps of the time. By 1868 the Palco de la Diputación was in such a lamentable state that Italian sculptor Augusto Franchy undertook the improvement himself, building a new area with a marble balustrade and the crest of the Real Maestranza de Caballería. The construction of five balconies to each side of the Palco de la Diputación was also added where the ring's clock is currently situated. The construction of the ring was completed in 1881; two thirds was constructed in stone, with the remainder in wood.

Between 1914 and 1915 the stone grandstands were redone in brick under the direction of Sevillian architect Aníbal González. All the rows were reconstructed with a smoother slope. Ten to twelve rows of shaded seating were constructed as well as fourteen rows in the sun and three rows of barrier. A row of armchairs were built in the superior part of the shaded area, in front of the theater boxes.

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    Founded: 1749
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    User Reviews

    Jamie Lee (10 months ago)
    Excellent tour with a knowledgeable and friendly guide. Not sure I agree with the slaughter of innocent animals. A nice stadium with that sense of drama and gladiatorial tension definitely apparent within the bull ring.
    Sophie Atkinson (11 months ago)
    Beautiful place, extremely well kept. You have to enter on a 'guided tour' which is actually an audioguide. It's informative. The tour lasts about 40 minutes; you have to stay with the group and the staff are quite quick to move you through the rooms. I felt it was worth the entry fee.
    Adeline Villette (11 months ago)
    Very beautiful place with a lot of history. It's better to book a time slot for when you really want to go (or be ready to wait). The guide was just here to told us which number press on the audio guide (the only disappointment)
    Simon B (12 months ago)
    A Bullring - not to every bodies taste! But if you are visiting this is part of the traditions and heritage of Spain, was really interesting to go behind the scenes and see the rooms used. Actually on the ring itself you get a feel for the nature of this cultural event. If you have an opinion and have not been then visiting will give you more of an insight. Well worth the small cost. Audio guide is useful as the guide on the tour only provides small details.
    Will G (12 months ago)
    Well, you have to understand the culture and history. The debate of bullfighting is apart from visiting this historic place. It is very well kept and has some interesting historical points about bullfighting. Good to see the building at least. Please like my reviews.
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