Situated in the basement of Metropol Parasol, Antiquarium is a modern, well-presented archaeological museum with sections of ruins visible through glass partitions, and underfoot along walkways.

These Roman and Moorish remains, dating from the first century BC to the 12th century AD, were discovered when the area was being excavated to build a car park in 2003. It was decided to incorporate them into the new Metropol Parasol development, with huge mushroom-shaped shades covering a market, restaurants and concert space.

There are 11 areas of remains: seven houses with mosaic floors, columns and wells; fish salting vats; and various streets. The best is Casa de la Columna (5th century AD), a large house with pillared patio featuring marble pedestals, surrounded by a wonderful mosaic floor – look out for the laurel wreath (used by emperors to symbolise military victory and glory) and diadem (similar meaning, used by athletes), both popular designs in the latter part of the Roman Empire. You can make out where the triclinium (dining room) was, and its smaller, second patio, the Patio de Oceano.

The symbol of the Antiquarium, the kissing birds, can be seen at the centre of a large mosaic which has been reconstructed on the wall of the museum. The other major mosaic is of Medusa, the god with hair of snakes, laid out on the floor. Look out for the elaborate drinking vessel at the corners of the mosaic floor of Casa de Baco (Bacchus’ house, god of wine).

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Details

Founded: 1st century BCE
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Warren Trout (8 months ago)
Small amount of ruins but the electronic displays are broke on many, so you have no idea what you are looking at. How about a plain signs?
Mikołaj Skorupa (9 months ago)
Pathetic service. They did not let us in with Alcazar tickets, even though the visit in Antiquarium is included, because we've had reduced (student) tickets that, according to the Alcazar website, should give the same range of services. The lady in the ticket office was unable to present any proof (pricelist, regulation, etc.) that reduced Alcazar tickets are not valid here, it seemed like she just made the rule up because our tickets were "too cheap".
Ioannis Giontzis (10 months ago)
Impressive place! A great stop to the city.
Jiaqiii Z (12 months ago)
Nice place to spend hot afternoon and it was interesting
Sam Tabotta (14 months ago)
It’s always interesting to see ancient structures and ruins. There’s plenty to observe here and it’s worth going in and having a look around.
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