Situated in the basement of Metropol Parasol, Antiquarium is a modern, well-presented archaeological museum with sections of ruins visible through glass partitions, and underfoot along walkways.

These Roman and Moorish remains, dating from the first century BC to the 12th century AD, were discovered when the area was being excavated to build a car park in 2003. It was decided to incorporate them into the new Metropol Parasol development, with huge mushroom-shaped shades covering a market, restaurants and concert space.

There are 11 areas of remains: seven houses with mosaic floors, columns and wells; fish salting vats; and various streets. The best is Casa de la Columna (5th century AD), a large house with pillared patio featuring marble pedestals, surrounded by a wonderful mosaic floor – look out for the laurel wreath (used by emperors to symbolise military victory and glory) and diadem (similar meaning, used by athletes), both popular designs in the latter part of the Roman Empire. You can make out where the triclinium (dining room) was, and its smaller, second patio, the Patio de Oceano.

The symbol of the Antiquarium, the kissing birds, can be seen at the centre of a large mosaic which has been reconstructed on the wall of the museum. The other major mosaic is of Medusa, the god with hair of snakes, laid out on the floor. Look out for the elaborate drinking vessel at the corners of the mosaic floor of Casa de Baco (Bacchus’ house, god of wine).

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Details

Founded: 1st century BCE
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Mark Grigsby (12 months ago)
Cool site (literally on a hot day). Interesting ruins under the Mushrooms...automated information video kiosks were not working though.
Nicholas Seaton (16 months ago)
Visiting here is a must. Go up to the top at sunset - you will not be disappointed!
Marcus Watts (18 months ago)
Very good aquarium, and was completely unexpected. Pretty easy to find and get to - a 20 min walk from the centre at a leisurely pace, about 5 mins on the bus. Good range of displays, with an impressive main tank. Well worth a visit when in Seville.
Stewart Torrance (18 months ago)
Very interesting museum highlighting the Roman heritage of Seville, cheap too at just over 2 euro for adults. Sadly most of the computer info terminals were not working when we visited, those that were gave some good insights to what you were seeing... real Roman ruins and artefacts!
Gerard Fleming (20 months ago)
Nice place to visit and only €2. Amazing how the Romans were so forward thinking in some ways. Probably all those lovely floors were slave labour at its worst.
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