Alcázar of Seville

Seville, Spain

The Alcázar of Seville is a royal palace, built for the Christian king Peter of Castile. It was built by Castilian Christians on the site of an Abbadid Muslim residential fortress destroyed after the Christian conquest of Seville. The palace, a pre-eminent example of Mudéjar architecture in the Iberian Peninsula, is renowned as one of the most beautiful. The upper levels of the Alcázar are still used by the royal family as their official residence in Seville, and are administered by the Patrimonio Nacional. It was registered in 1987 by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

The original nucleus of the Alcázar was constructed in the 10th century as the palace of the Muslim governor. Built and rebuilt from the early Middle Ages right up to our times, it consists of a group of palatial buildings and extensive gardens. The Alcázar embraces a rare compendium of cultures where areas of the original Almohad palace - such as the 'Patio del Yeso' or the 'Jardines del Crucero' - coexist with the Palacio de Pedro I representing Spanish Mudejar art, together with other constructions displaying every cultural style from the Renaissance to the Neoclassical.

Some gardens have Renaissance statues. After damage by the 1755 Lisbon earthquake, that façade of the Palacio Gótico overlooking the Patio del Crucero was completely renovated in Baroque style.

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Details

Founded: 10th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

robin darch (4 months ago)
Really worth going and really worth going early ,booking in advance or like us taking the opportunity to jump the queue with a guided tour. Reckon we saved 45 to 60 mins. This actually made the place more enjoyable listening to the history, the stories, the craftsmanship and hearing about the recent Game of thrones filming. Once we had finished the tour we were at our leisure to explore the best bits again. A highlight of Seville for sure.
Jose Lucina (5 months ago)
Simply beautiful. I loved the elaborate mix of Muslim and Christian design work throughout the entire facility. Its not common to see the two living in harmony in the media today, but on these walls it is enshrined that at some time in the past our two cultures were friends (even though only for a short time). Please take a tour so that you can notice the subtle designs and the brevity of their significance.
Ray Forgianni (5 months ago)
This World Heritage site is a sleeper, far better than expected. Not as large as Alhambra but more intense in its beauty. Great examples of both Moorish architecture & finishes as well as renaissance. Wonderful interior plazas. But the real surprise was the extensive and diverse gardens. Flowers, palms, mazes, peacocks. Bring good walking shoes because it is bigger than you think.
shadee vernet (5 months ago)
This palace is BEAUTIFUL. I am so glad we did the detour to come check it out. We went just before closing and that was perfect... Less people and noise. They let you stay about 1h after closing. You can actually enjoy the visit. I'm also a GOT fan so I was excited. The architecture and artistry that was put in this structure is amazing. Everything from the walls, gardens, the facades.. amazing. If you don't go see it, you'll regret it. It's a must just for it's beauty !
Larry Taylor (5 months ago)
This is an amazing place! Palace after connected Palace showing art decor and magnificent gardens. I can try to describe it and show pictures, but would not do it justice. This is one the places you must see while in Seville, Spain. It is so rich in history influenced by Muslim to Christianity. A UNESCO world heritage site, its something you must see. Just breathtaking.
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