Seville Cathedral

Seville, Spain

Seville's cathedral, Santa Maria de la Sede, is the largest Gothic cathedral in the world, and is recognised as UNESCO World Heritage. After its completion in the early 16th century, Seville Cathedral supplanted Hagia Sophia as the largest cathedral in the world, a title the Byzantine church had held for nearly a thousand years.

History

The basilica occupies the site of the great Aljama mosque, built in the late 12th century by the Almohads, the ruling Moorish dynasty, of which the only remaining parts are the Patio de Naranjas, the Puerta del Perdon (on Calle Alemanes, on the north side), and the Giralda (formerly the minaret, now the belltower).

Shortly after Seville's conquest by Ferdinand III, the mosque was converted into the city's cathedral. Its orientation was changed and its spaces partitioned and adorned to suit Christian worship practices. The internal space was gradually divided into chapels by constructing walls in the bays along the northern and southern walls. Almost the entire eastern half of the cathedral was occupied by the royal chapel that would hold the bodies of Ferdinand, his wife and Alfonso the Wise.

In 1401, city leaders decided to build a new cathedral to replace the grand mosque that served as the cathedral until then. Construction continued until 1506. The clergy of the parish offered half their stipends to pay for architects, artists, stained glass artisans, masons, carvers, craftsman and labourers and other expenses. Five years after construction ended, in 1511, the crossing lantern, or cimborrio, collapsed and work on the cathedral recommenced. The crossing again collapsed in 1888 due an earthquake, and work on the dome continued until at least 1903.

Architecture

The interior has the longest nave of any cathedral in Spain. The central nave rises to a height of 42 metres. In the main body of the cathedral, the most noticeable features are the great boxlike choir loft, which fills the central portion of the nave, and the vast Gothic retablo of carved scenes from the life of Christ. This altarpiece was the lifetime work of a single craftsman, Pierre Dancart.

The Capilla Mayor (Great Chapel), dominated by a vast Gothic retablo (altarpiece) comprised of 45 carved scenes from the life of Christ, as well as Santa Maria de la Sede, the cathedral's patron saint. The lifetime's work of a single craftsman, Pierre Dancart, this is the ultimate masterpiece of the cathedral - the largest and richest altarpiece in the world and one of the finest examples of Gothic woodcarving anywhere.

The Giralda is the bell tower of the Cathedral of Seville. Its height is 105 m. The Giralda is the former minaret of the mosque that stood on the site under Muslim rule, and was built to resemble the minaret of the Koutoubia Mosque in Marrakech, Morocco. It was converted into a bell tower for the cathedral after the Reconquista, although the topmost section dates from the Renaissance.

The tomb of Christopher Columbus is one of the main attractions of the cathedral for visitors, housing the remains of the great explorer who died in poverty in Valladolid. The tomb itself is more recent, from the 1892, with four bearers presenting the kingdoms of Castile, Leon, Aragon and Navarra.

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Founded: 1401
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.8/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Joseph Peters-Mathews (10 months ago)
While this cathedral is a liturgically confused space, it is beautiful. The baptismal font sets a model for all baptismal fonts that aren't full baptistries. My biggest complaint is that most things were gated off in one way or another, including the main altar and its reredos. On the other hand, though, I *loved* that the back of the space is used as a gallery for the cathedral's archive of vestments, and that they're rotated every six months. All in all it was a great visit because people respected the quiet — and the employees ran a tight ship. Definitely get your tickets in advance and be right on time!
Josefine Navarrete (12 months ago)
It was SO beautiful. We had an awesome guide that gave us the history of each room. It’s definitely worth your time. Loved it ?
Carissa More (13 months ago)
Nice cathedral but the inside does not match the grandeur of the exterior. It seems they only allow you to see half the interior space with the ticket. Lovely, but underwhelming after viewing some other famous cathedrals
Oso N (14 months ago)
Stunning landmark and beautiful piece of human history! The architecture is absolutely breathtaking from the outside, alone. The interior is another mesmerizing experience, from the tall Spanish thresholds to the stained glass. I have so much respect for the architects of this time period. I hope to see sites like this preserved for as long as possible. Sadly, many of the locals take world heritage sites like these granted, and even vandalize them with graffiti and litter.
LDH RetiredAndTravelling (15 months ago)
The Seville Cathedral was a beautiful stop in the Santa Cruz neighborhood in Seville. The outside architecture was stunning. Walk around and check out the doors. Each one is intricately decorated with stone carvings. For more check out the RetiredAndTravelling blog post on the Santa Cruz area.
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