Plaza de España

Seville, Spain

The Plaza de España in the Parque de María Luisa was built in 1928 for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929. It is a landmark example of the Regionalism Architecture, mixing elements of the Baroque Revival, Renaissance Revival and Moorish Revival (Neo-Mudéjar) styles of Spanish architecture.

The plaza complex is a huge half-circle with buildings continually running around the edge accessible over the moat by numerous bridges representing the four ancient kingdoms of Spain. In the centre is the Vicente Traver fountain. By the walls of the Plaza are many tiled alcoves, each representing a different province of Spain. Each alcove is flanked by a pair of covered bookshelves, said to be used by visitors in the manner of 'Little Free Library'. Each bookshelf often contains information about their province, yet you can often find regular books as well for some people have taken to donating their favorite book to these shelves.

The Plaza de España has been used as a filming location, including scenes for the 1962 film Lawrence of Arabia. The building was used as a location in the Star Wars movie series Star Wars: Episode II – Attack of the Clones (2002) — in which it featured in exterior shots of the City of Theed on the Planet Naboo. It also featured in the 2012 film The Dictator.

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More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Felix Gan (11 months ago)
What a lovely view of this city! This has been the most amazing view of this city has to offer. Lots of history, Rich in architecture and whole place filled with music and people cheering the place. Would recommend people to definitely come to this square when they visit this city.
Ray Forgianni (11 months ago)
Huge complex of fine tile work monument representing every corner of Spain. Located in a large heavily landscaped park, beautiful in it's own right. Large central fountain in the middle of a substantial plaza which in turn is surrounded by a moat. Small row boats are available for those who wish to enjoy the ambiance. Quite a walk from the old city. Pride of Sevilla.
Simon Croucher (11 months ago)
Just beautiful. A must see place in Seville. Best time is as the sun goes down for the light to give that warm glow. The gardens attached are a lovely cool walk and cut across the corner of the roads when on foot. There's a boating lake around this building too, which was a surprise.
Elizabeth P (11 months ago)
Impressive and stunning, walking around it was interesting to see the whole of Spain represented by the tiles. Lots of performers about expressing themselves which is nice to see. The horse carriage experience is not necessary and you get a fuller experience walking around (if you're capable of course!). The boats in the man made water way came across as an entire tourist trap and would be best to be avoided. Leave old Seville for an hour, you won't be disappointed.
Ali Smart (11 months ago)
Beautiful spot. We were lucky to catch a flamenco show performing here in the plaza. Nothing like it. Seeing the dancing, taking in the emotional songs in this beautiful setting. It was more impressive than the flamenco show we paid for the night before. If you can highly recommend catching the flamenco performers here.
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