Palacio de las Dueñas

Seville, Spain

Palacio de las Dueñas (Palace of the Dukes of Alba) currently belongs to the House of Alba. It was built in the late 15th century in the Renaissance style with Gothic and Moorish influences. The palace is one of the major historic homes in the city of great architectural and artistic heritage. Today it is one of the most visited monuments in Seville.

The palace consists of a series of courtyards and buildings. The style ranges from Gothic art-Moorish to the Renaissance, with local influences in the bricks, shingles, tiles, whitewashed walls and pottery.

The palace is fitted with long passageways. At the top floor of the palace, there is a room whose ceiling is of an octagonal shape and is decorated with alfarje gold.

The entry door is of Mudéjar style. The palace was fitted with eleven patios, nine fountains, and over 100 marble columns. Of these, one patio remains, and it is surrounded by a gallery with columns. The Andalusian patio dominates the exterior of the property. At the entrance to the palace, in the main archway, there is the shield of the Duchy of Alba in tiles, made by Triana of Seville in the 17th or 18th century. The gardens also have very important unique species.

The courtyard garden, divided into four parts in keeping with its traditional Islamic style, includes tiled paths and a centralized raised fountain. The palace garden's lemon trees and fountain are recurring symbols in Machado's poetry. Behind the garden is a courtyard surrounded by arches with columns of white marble. The arch situated west of the courtyard in the lower galleries gives access to the building that was used as the chapel palace. The 15th-century chapel has fared badly during restorations. The chapel's altar contains several tiles with metallic reflections, typical of 16th-century Seville ceramics.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

Rating

4.2/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Bastien Louis (12 months ago)
The place is stunning but it should be less expensive. 5 euros max, for 10 euros, it does not wort it, we cannot even go upstair! Also, it is not normal to pay that price and have the visit in the patio ruins by the security staff having a phone conversation for 30 minutes. That place deserve quietness. That's a shame.
David Crook (12 months ago)
Beautiful cool gardens on a very hot day. The property contains a multitude of exhibits and is well worth a visit when in Seville.
Charlie Webber (12 months ago)
Beautiful house and garden centrally located. Probably worth going before early afternoon to avoid the heat in the garden but most definitely a must see
Katyayani Prabhu (13 months ago)
If u want to listen to birds chirping, see beautiful vines, witness long trees this is the place. Place is so green and rich with natural beauty. Do not miss for the quiet.
Cristina Coșa (13 months ago)
This Palace was an unexpected discovery because of the building with its terraces and very beautiful gardens, right in the heart of the old town of Seville. If you visit it on Mondays, the visit is free after 16h00 in the limit of 100 visitors per hour, if you are coming from a country in the EU. The visit totally worth it even if you pay the ticket of 10 eur, because of the story of the building, the magic of the gardens and the lovely architecture. I highly recommend it.
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