Church of Saint Louis of France

Seville, Spain

The Society of Jesus arrived in Seville in 1554 and constructed a church, a professed house and a novitiate. At the beginning of the 17th century, Lucia de Medina donated land for a new, larger building and a new church with the conditions that she would be buried in the chapel and that the church be dedicated to her patron saint, Saint Louis (Louis IX of France, medieval king and first brother of King Ferdinand III of Castile and León, who reconquered Seville.)

Construction of the church began in 1699 and ended in 1730. The Jesuits abandoned the church in 1767 as a result of the Royal Order of Carlos III that expelled the Jesuits from Spain. Although they returned in 1817, the expulsion of 1835 forced them to abandon the complex altogether.

Unlike many other churches in Seville, Saint Louis was saved from destruction by the fires of 1936. Because of this, and its period of disuse, many parts of the original design have been preserved.

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Details

Founded: 1699
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

José Maria d'Orey da Cunha (9 months ago)
Breathtaking baroque church and chapel. Free on Sundays afternoon.
Natalka Ka (13 months ago)
One of my favorite places to visit! Check out which day allows you to enter the place for free! However even with a paid entrance it's well worth it ?
Riaz Shaikh (14 months ago)
Beautiful place. If you are here in town must visit. ❤️
M in Paris (18 months ago)
Beautiful mind blowing church. Free entrance Sunday afternoon
Simon (2 years ago)
A beautiful baroque church, pretty well maintained. Entrance fee is 4€ for adults, you get access to the church, the chapel and the crypt. Could be better but it's not a bad value and the church is unique.
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