Church of Saint Louis of France

Seville, Spain

The Society of Jesus arrived in Seville in 1554 and constructed a church, a professed house and a novitiate. At the beginning of the 17th century, Lucia de Medina donated land for a new, larger building and a new church with the conditions that she would be buried in the chapel and that the church be dedicated to her patron saint, Saint Louis (Louis IX of France, medieval king and first brother of King Ferdinand III of Castile and León, who reconquered Seville.)

Construction of the church began in 1699 and ended in 1730. The Jesuits abandoned the church in 1767 as a result of the Royal Order of Carlos III that expelled the Jesuits from Spain. Although they returned in 1817, the expulsion of 1835 forced them to abandon the complex altogether.

Unlike many other churches in Seville, Saint Louis was saved from destruction by the fires of 1936. Because of this, and its period of disuse, many parts of the original design have been preserved.

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Details

Founded: 1699
Category: Castles and fortifications in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dante Bruno (12 months ago)
Beauty spot with great art
Tetyana Neeley (12 months ago)
One of the most spectacular Barocco architecture. A special touch was provided by workers there. The lady who worked as a security guard gave us such a wonderful tour guide. This church displaces many saints relics.
Isabel María Presa (13 months ago)
A great clasical music concert the other night and a wonderful renovation of the building. Congratulations
Rebecca s (13 months ago)
So pretty! How could yo go wrong with a church in Europe anyways!
Tony Carter (15 months ago)
Wow!!! Astonishing building, great city to visit and you must see this.
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