Palace of the Countess of Lebrija

Seville, Spain

The Lebrija Palace or Palacio de la Condesa de Lebrija is a house-museum in central Seville. Dating to the 16th century and remodeled between the 18th and 20th centuries, the palace is characterised by its collection of art, including Roman mosaics and other antiquities as well as Asian art, paintings by European masters and European decorative arts.

The interior of the palace is decorated in a palette of architectural styles, with elements such as Moorish arches, Plateresque decoration, tilework retrieved from ruined convent, a coffered ceiling from a 16th-century palace and a Renaissance frieze, while its façade and layout reflect typical Andalusian style.

The collection includes Roman mosaics that pave almost the entire ground floor. Of particular note is the mosaic depicting the god Pan that was discovered on land owned by the countess and can be found in the palace’s central courtyard. The mosaic’s central medallion represents Pan, who is serenading Galatea on his flute, while the other medallions show the love stories of Zeus and the corners contain representations of the four seasons.

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Address

Calle Cuna 8, Seville, Spain
See all sites in Seville

Details

Founded: 16th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

Rating

4.3/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Catherine Petit (11 months ago)
It is a palace. Filled with art affects she collected. Very interesting.
fara diana (11 months ago)
The palace is really spectacular. It is divided into two levels. In the ground level, pictures and videos are allowed but not in the upper level. To visit the upper level, it must be with the authorized guide.
Viorel Mocanu (11 months ago)
Guide spoke awful English. Place was full of dust and smelled really bad. Art gallery is a scam (just 2 paintings). The house and decor, however, were interesting enough to make it bearable. Ah, and no photos on the 1st floor...
Thais Adamowicz (13 months ago)
It's nice, but not worth for the price you pay. There are more interesting, bigger and more significant things in Seville you can see for half of this price.
Paul Herman (13 months ago)
Fantastic! A gem among all of the extraordinary buildings and collections in Seville. Guadalupe, who runs the place, is charming and well-informed, too. The Countess (died at 87 in 1999 when the house was opened to the public) had exceptional good taste and willingness to put her rare collection of art (Moorish, Spanish and, above all, Roman) first. Even redesigning rooms to house the items better (like perfectly preserved ancient Roman mosaic floors). Must not be missed while visiting Seville!
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