Archeological Museum of Seville

Seville, Spain

The Archeological Museum of Seville is housed in the Pabellón del Renacimiento, one of the pavilions designed by the architect Aníbal González. These pavilions at the Plaza de España were created for the Ibero-American Exposition of 1929.

The museum's basement houses the El Carambolo treasure, discovered in Camas in 1958. The treasure comprises 2950 grams of 24 carat gold and consists of golden bracelets, a golden chain with pendant, buckles, belt- and forehead plates. Some regard the El Carambolo treasure as proof of the Tartessian roots of Seville. This is, however, disputed because the treasure includes a small figurine of Astarte, a Phoenician goddess.

Other halls of the museum contain findings from the Roman era, many of which are from the nearby Roman city of Itálica. The Itálica exhibits include mosaics, statues (including the famous Venus of Itálica), and busts of the emperors Augustus, Vespasianus, Trajan and Hadrian.

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Details

Founded: 1929
Category: Museums in Spain

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

daemon gomez (10 months ago)
A really nice small museum. It's just a shame there's not more information In English.
jon wright (11 months ago)
Free museum with one of the most extensive and interesting Roman displays I've seen anywhere. A must see for lovers of ancient history.
Ernest Hemiguey (11 months ago)
You can see here good examples of roman, Arabic, Spain architecture
Janine Long (13 months ago)
Great pieces from Neanderthal to Roman times. The building itself is also beautiful and the gardens surrounding it.
DAMIEN FERAUD (15 months ago)
Excellent collection exposed, but museum staff are the typical vague and unpleasant officials. Do not speak a word of English! and they do not make the minimum effort to properly attend to the public. They would not hire them in a funeral home. The State should take better care of these places.
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