Royal Tobacco Factory

Seville, Spain

The Royal Tobacco Factory, an 18th-century industrial building was, at the time it was built the second largest building in Spain, second only to the royal residence El Escorial. It remains one of the largest and most architecturally distinguished industrial buildings ever built in that country, and one of the oldest such buildings to survive.

Since the 1950s it has been the seat of the rectorate of the University of Seville. Prior to that, it was, as its name indicates, a tobacco factory: the most prominent such institution in Europe, and a lineal descendant of Europe's first tobacco factory, which was located nearby. It is one of the most notable and splendid examples of industrial architecture from the era of Spain's Antiguo Régimen.

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    Details

    Founded: 18th century
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    More Information

    en.wikipedia.org

    Rating

    4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

    User Reviews

    SARAH Mclaughlin (15 months ago)
    Free to look around. Great if you like looking at architecture and statues. Good for photos
    john smith (16 months ago)
    I went there with the free tour and there’s a lot of information and history about the place. The building is spectacular and it’s a part of the university now.
    Huzeifa Husein (16 months ago)
    Historic place. Very nice architecture
    Ken Berry (17 months ago)
    Amazing now a university and you can just walk around it
    Dy Yd (18 months ago)
    Very impressive. Try to get local guide who Will be able to tell you the story of the place during the tour inside
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