The Moorish Castle is the name given to a medieval fortification in Gibraltar comprising various buildings, gates, and fortified walls, with the dominant features being the Tower of Homage and the Gate House. Although sometimes compared to the nearby alcazars in Spain, the Moorish Castle in Gibraltar was constructed by the Marinid dynasty, making it unique in the Iberian Peninsula.

The Moorish occupation is by far the longest in Gibraltar's recorded history, having lasted from 711 to 1309 and then again from 1333 to 1462, a total of 727 years.

Construction of the Moorish Castle commenced in the 8th century AD. Its walls enclosed a considerable area, reaching down from the upper part of the Rock of Gibraltar to the sea. The most conspicuous remaining parts of the Castle are the upper tower, or Tower of Homage, together with various terraces and battlements below it, and the massive Gate House, with its cupola roof.

The present Tower of Homage, and most of what is visible today of the Castle, was rebuilt during the second Moorish period of occupation in the early 14th century, after its near destruction during a reconquest of Gibraltar by the Moors following a re-occupation by Spanish forces from 1309 to 1333.

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Founded: 8th century AD
Category: Castles and fortifications in United Kingdom

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User Reviews

Hanna Kiani (2 years ago)
Nice views and presents a lot of history. Quite basic.
The Mighty Kinkle (2 years ago)
Moorish like some snacks. You just want more and more
jashsdn (2 years ago)
Stunning views of the town and runway. Great place to watch the planes landing into Gibraltar Airport.
Len Kroon (2 years ago)
historically significant, beautiful atmosphere in prayer space, amazing views
brinda v (2 years ago)
Breath taking views from the top of the castle. Be ready to climb a few flights of stairs (not recommended to take strollers). A quick pit stop while in the Natural reserve.
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