Palacio de la Merced

Córdoba, Spain

The Palacio de la Merced is a historical building in Córdoba. Once home to the convent of La Merced Calzada, it is now home to the Provincial Government of Córdoba, a sovra-municipal services institution of the province of Córdoba.

Excavations in the site have revealed the presence of ancient Roman ashlars. Later findings include medieval remains of a baptistery and of a crypt, identified with the Palaeo-Christian or Visigothic basilica of St. Eulalia, assigned by some scholars to the reign of king Reccared I.

The foundation of the palace is traditionally connected to Peter Nolasco, whom king Ferdinand III of Castile had donated the Basilica of St. Eulalia after the conquest of the city in the early 13th century. There are few traces of the 13th convent, however. The current edifice dates to the 18th century, the church dating to 1716-1745. The later has a Latin cross plan, with a nave, two aisles and a transept. The cloister, with a rectangular plan and round arches, was finished in 1752.

Some renovations occurred in 1850, when it became a hospital, and 1960, when it became the seat of the Provincial Deputy. In 1978 the church suffered a fire that destroyed the high altar and other artworks.

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Details

Founded: 18th century
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

George Cairns (8 months ago)
It was all about the honey - honey and pollen
Domingos Coragem (9 months ago)
Very nice.
P Adair (13 months ago)
A pretty building with a beautiful courtyard. There was some very interesting art work that on display in the courtyard and in the halls on the second floor.. It seemed to be an operating government adminstrative building. There was no cost to enter and view. Overall worth a quick visit.
P U (13 months ago)
Beautiful example of Spanish architecture. Cheers from Australia.
Jason C (17 months ago)
What a waste of time! I made the long walk here from alcazar (30m walk) only to leave feeling massively shortchanged. Yes the building looks grand from the outside. But step inside and all you see is a courtyard - like those you find anywhere else in Spain - and some art paintings on the wall. That's it. The other areas are all blocked off for tourists as they are government offices. Please don't go out of your way to come here. Stick to the alcazar and the grand mosque and the palace de reina. Utter disappointment.
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