Archaeological Museum of Córdoba

Córdoba, Spain

The Archaeological museum of Córdoba represents the most complete collection of historic Spanish artifacts in the world, with a staggering 33,500 items in total. Exhibits include prehistoric artifacts, ancient Iberian items including sculptures and reliefs, Moorish art, Roman antiquities, and archaeological finds from Medina Azahara. Located at the Palacio de los Páez de Castillejo, the museum grounds are also home to an archaeological dig site on the premises. Here, tourists will find the city's original Roman amphitheater, as well as homes and workshops dating back to the Middle Ages, all of which were discovered long after the museum found its home here.

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Details

Founded: 1868
Category: Museums in Spain

More Information

www.planetware.com

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Silfana Nasri (7 months ago)
This was a GREAT museum! Very informative
Amido Goodnight (8 months ago)
Both Spanish and English explanations of displays. Very well organized museum and not overwhelming.
joris welkenhuysen (11 months ago)
Very well done. And free for EU citizens!
Hans Hansen (13 months ago)
Come, see, read and learn. Comprehend and keep living accordingly. So now you know your to do list. What are you waiting for?
Chris Parsons (14 months ago)
We stopped through for an hour the morning we had to leave and it was just about right. Lots of great artifacts and history in great condition in a very nice museum. The old Roman theatre it was built on is very cool to see inside. Highly recommend for something that lots may overlook in the area.
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