San Jerónimo de Valparaíso Monastery

Córdoba, Spain

On the hills above the amazing Medina Azahara, nestling in the mountains of Córdoba and surrounded by native Mediterranean vegetation, stands this impressive 15th century monastery. It was originally Gothic in style, although different reforms in Renaissance and Baroque style have added a wealth of interesting details to the building.

The owners, the Marquises of El Mérito, have done a great job over several generations in restoring the building.The grand facade, with its balconies and windows, is an impressive sight and in the middle of the entrance there is a white marble medallion with a relief of St. Jerome. Within, the main courtyard is a cloister with Doric columns and Gothic vaults, with several chapels leading off it.

Visiting times: Only certain days a year through Medina Azahara.

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Details

Founded: 15th century
Category: Religious sites in Spain

Rating

4.6/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Rafael Parejas Valls (2 years ago)
Un lugar espectacular.
Maria Jose Dominguez Serrano (2 years ago)
Es imposible visitar este monasterio porque cuando se abre la página para acceder a la petición de la cita se agota antes de que de tiempo ni siquiera de pinchar el día, en mí opinión creo que hay truco.
juan perez (2 years ago)
Una joya del pasado, estoy loco por verlo por dentro, pero es tan difícil, lo dicho una joya arquitectónica.
Maria Polo Lopez (2 years ago)
Es muy bonito mi cuñada trabaja alli
Carlos pulido (2 years ago)
La lastima de este lugar es que siendo patrimonio cultural no pueda ser visitado libremente. Es un sitio increíble.
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