Julio Romero de Torres Museum

Córdoba, Spain

The Julio Romero de Torres Museum is notable for containing the largest collection of the famous Cordoban painter Julio Romero de Torres. It is located in the building of the old Hospital of la Caridad, which also houses the Museum of Fine Arts of Córdoba.

After the death of Julio Romero de Torres on May 10, 1930, Francisca Pellicer, widow of the painter, and their children, Rafael, Amalia and María, decided to create a museum dedicated to the memory of the artist, bequeathing it to the city of Córdoba. So, in 1931, the museum was created and inaugurated by the president of the republic, Niceto Alcalá Zamora. In 1934, the adjoining house was purchased, and the current museum was inaugurated on May 24, 1936. The last remodeling dates back to 1992, for the installation of lighting and security systems, as well as for the renovation of part of the structures of the museum.

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Details

Founded: 1931
Category: Museums in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Killfill_ (7 months ago)
It's okay, probably great if you're really into Julio Romero, but a lot of the paintings are very similar in style
Catherine Perez (7 months ago)
It's a small museum with beautiful works of art. Julio Romero likes to paint women's faces and bodies and he does it very nicely and sublime. My husband and I like it a lot!
Jason Baldachino (9 months ago)
Beautiful artwork. Small museum (~4 gallery rooms )
John Nellen (13 months ago)
Wonderful pictures, only too expensive for too few pictures. The museum on the opposite side is free for all.
Jesús Cardenal (15 months ago)
A great way to get to know the famous artist and his paintings
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