Julio Romero de Torres Museum

Córdoba, Spain

The Julio Romero de Torres Museum is notable for containing the largest collection of the famous Cordoban painter Julio Romero de Torres. It is located in the building of the old Hospital of la Caridad, which also houses the Museum of Fine Arts of Córdoba.

After the death of Julio Romero de Torres on May 10, 1930, Francisca Pellicer, widow of the painter, and their children, Rafael, Amalia and María, decided to create a museum dedicated to the memory of the artist, bequeathing it to the city of Córdoba. So, in 1931, the museum was created and inaugurated by the president of the republic, Niceto Alcalá Zamora. In 1934, the adjoining house was purchased, and the current museum was inaugurated on May 24, 1936. The last remodeling dates back to 1992, for the installation of lighting and security systems, as well as for the renovation of part of the structures of the museum.

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Founded: 1931
Category: Museums in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Angel Medina (11 months ago)
Nice quiet small place with beautiful courtyard. The only downside is it is quite small, two floors, and four rooms in total with an exhibition room.
Jerry Zhang (11 months ago)
very nice museum! not huge but dense there is also the julio romero de torres museum across
Mohamed Azouar (2 years ago)
Nice but a bit small. Entrance is free if you're from Europe
María Ollivier (2 years ago)
If you like religious paintings, this is your place. It's free to European residents.
Philip Lindsay (3 years ago)
Outstanding. The vast majority of the works are by the artist himself - and he has a wonderful and distinctive style with echos of the Pre-Raphaelite. It's a must-see.
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