Julio Romero de Torres Museum

Córdoba, Spain

The Julio Romero de Torres Museum is notable for containing the largest collection of the famous Cordoban painter Julio Romero de Torres. It is located in the building of the old Hospital of la Caridad, which also houses the Museum of Fine Arts of Córdoba.

After the death of Julio Romero de Torres on May 10, 1930, Francisca Pellicer, widow of the painter, and their children, Rafael, Amalia and María, decided to create a museum dedicated to the memory of the artist, bequeathing it to the city of Córdoba. So, in 1931, the museum was created and inaugurated by the president of the republic, Niceto Alcalá Zamora. In 1934, the adjoining house was purchased, and the current museum was inaugurated on May 24, 1936. The last remodeling dates back to 1992, for the installation of lighting and security systems, as well as for the renovation of part of the structures of the museum.

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Founded: 1931
Category: Museums in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Philip Lindsay (9 months ago)
Outstanding. The vast majority of the works are by the artist himself - and he has a wonderful and distinctive style with echos of the Pre-Raphaelite. It's a must-see.
Tal Cohen (9 months ago)
An amazing amazing museum. What a beautiful paintings.
David Serra (10 months ago)
The paintings are beautiful, I would have loved to know/see more about the posters, the art nouveau and possible relations with Mucha or his Paris Travels. Once again, the entrance with having to book online...a mess. At least is for free until September. Once again, compared to Granada, I feel people are not particularly welcoming the tourist. A pity because would make this Beautiful city much more attractive...
Ed & Denise D. (16 months ago)
Well presented paintings/displays. Small and easy to navigate through the two floors of art. No photography allowed. Well worth the visit if you are into fine art. Allow about 1 hour for a thorough visit.
Felicity (17 months ago)
What a gem! Lovely staff, marble floors, rich red walls, unobtrusive guitar music & of course the singular paintings. It's all set in a a delightful courtyard in a charming square. English panels for each painting & a guidebook (€3) in English/French. €4 Entry.
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