Luttra Passage Grave

Falköping, Sweden

The Neolithic passage grave (a tomb where the burial chamber is reached along a distinct, and usually low, passage) of Luttra is one of the best preserved of its kind in Västergötland. Still time has not been acting too gracious on this site, this ancient tomb is damaged and even partly destroyed. It only has one roofblock left, and the passage is just a metre long - it originally used to be longer. But it is, nevertheless, an impressive witness of a distant past, being as old as some of the Egyptian pyramides.

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patrickcarlson said 4 years ago
I want to see this!


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2806, Falköping, Sweden
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Details

Founded: ca. 3400 BC
Category: Cemeteries, mausoleums and burial places in Sweden
Historical period: Neolithic Age (Sweden)

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