San Donato Church

Genoa, Italy

San Donato dates from the 12th century and is in Romanesque style. It became a parish under archbishop Siro il Porcello, and was consecrated on May 1, 1189.

After the bombardment of 1684 it was restored several times, being again consecrated on December 4, 1892. Other restorations in 1946-1951 have kept its Romanesque appearance.

The interior contains a Madonna by the 14th-century painter Nicolò da Voltri; a St Joseph, by Domenico Piola; and a marble relief of the Baptism of Christ, started by Ignazio Peschiera and completed by his pupil Carlo Rubatto. There is also a tryptich (1515) by Joos van Cleve representing The Adoration of the Magi; the person who commissioned the work Stefano Raggi with Guardian Saint ; and a Mary Magdalen. This is topped by a Crucifixion scene with Mary and St John the Evangelist.

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Address

Via San Donato 10, Genoa, Italy
See all sites in Genoa

Details

Founded: 1189
Category: Religious sites in Italy

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Robert Carlson (13 months ago)
Several 15th century paintings that are well restored or worth the visit to San donato
Darren Cassar (18 months ago)
A beautiful beautiful church. The crucifix is lit just before sunset through a window on the opposite side of the church.
hansuli matter (19 months ago)
a must see ..
Derek Webb (2 years ago)
Well worth a visit for the quality of its works of art. Afternoons only.
emdjed islem (3 years ago)
I got there a spiritual journey... amazing experience
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