By the 12th century a castle was built in Münsingen town from which the Senn family ruled the town. However, it was demolished by Bern in 1311. A wooden outbuilding was built on the castle lands three years later, which later became the cantonal psychiatric clinic. In 1550 the Schultheiss Hans Franz Nägeli rebuilt the castle building into its current appearance. It was renovated and repaired in 1749–53. In 1977 the municipality acquired the castle and converted it into a municipal museum.

The museum is open Friday and Sunday from October until April. It contains two permanent exhibits as well as occasional temporary exhibits. The first permanent exhibit focuses on the history of the town and on the Steiger family who lived in the castle for almost three centuries. The second permanent exhibit focuses on the work of the famous puppeteer, Therese Keller (1923-1972) who was a pioneer in the puppet theater in Switzerland.

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Founded: 1550
Category: Castles and fortifications in Switzerland

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en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Stephan Schobinger (4 months ago)
Ob für idyllische Hochzeiten, als Lokalität für Ausstellungen oder als Raum für Essen und Veranstaltungen eine faszinierende, festliche und unvergessliche Umgebung.
Aurelia S. (7 months ago)
Es lohnt sich! Wir habe die szenische Führung besichtigt..das war soo interessant und das Schloss ist sehr schön. Die Geschichte und die Führung dauern 1:30 Stunde..aber die Zeit ist geflogen! Sehr entspannend! Die Schauspielerin ist sehr gut.. wir haben einen sehr angenehmen Moment verbracht. Der Park des Schlosses lohnt sich auch ich kann nur empfehlen
Manuel Kehrli (2 years ago)
Manuel Meister (2 years ago)
Schöner Park Schloss ist nicht zu spektakulär
Thomas Maurer (4 years ago)
Ein schöner Ort.
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