Cathedral of St. John the Baptist

Przemyśl, Poland

The Greek Catholic Cathedral of St John the Baptist in Przemyśl serves as the mother church of the Ukrainian Greek Catholic Archeparchy of Peremyshl-Warsaw.

The church was built in the 17th century by the Jesuit order and dedicated to St. Ignatius. After Przemyśl fell under Austrian rule and the suppression of the order in 1773 it slowly fell into ruins and in 1820 was closed by Austrians and turned into a storehouse. With the gradual democratization of region in the second half of the 19th century plans appeared to restore the church, finally carried out in 1903 and in 1904 the former Jesuit church was reconsecrated in 1904 as Sacred Heart of Jesus. After World War II it served as a garrison church and also offered a weekly Mass in the Byzantine Rite for Ukrainian Catholics whose church had been closed by the communist government.

In 1991 the church was subject of a controversy, when the Roman Catholic Church (with personal oversight by pope John Paul II) decided to donate the building to the Greek Catholic population in Przemyśl, to serve as the cathedral of the Archeparchy of Peremyshl-Warsaw in place of the Carmelite Church, which after World War II has returned to the Carmelites. After this decision, local Polish nationalists blockaded the entrance to the Greek Catholics and organized a hunger strike. After several weeks of debate and negotiation they desisted.

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Details

Founded: 17th century
Category: Religious sites in Poland

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.7/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Dariusz Taudul (17 days ago)
Będąc w Przemyślu nie sposób ominąć jeden z piękniejszych i ważniejszych zabytków miasta.
Maciej Borski (3 months ago)
Unfortunately, I only saw the interior from behind the bars. Nevertheless, the council made a great impression on me. It was built by the Jesuits in the years 1626-1632. From 1957, the liturgy in the Byzantine-Ukrainian rite was also celebrated there, and in 1991 the Przemyśl-Warsaw Archdiocese received the post-Jesuit complex in place of the church. St. Teresa oo. Carmelites, who played the role of the Greek Catholic cathedral before the war. In the 20th century, the garrison church. In 1991, John Paul II donated the church to Greek Catholics who adapted it to the needs of the Eastern rite. In front of the main altar there is a historic iconostasis belonging to the Western Ukrainian church painting, which was created in the 1780s for the monastery church in Szczepłoty near Krakowiec (Lviv region). It is one of the best-preserved works of the seventeenth-century West Ukrainian church painting. Its splendor was restored by thorough conservation carried out in 1994 - 1999.
Roman Wawrzyniaczyk (3 months ago)
I wish I could see being inside and not say the interior looked impressive from behind the bars.
Apollo Froso (2 years ago)
Fine
Natalie N. (2 years ago)
Unfortunately the church was closed and we didn't get in but it seemed to look gorgeous.
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