San Domingos Convent Ruins

Pontevedra, Spain

San Domingos Convent was founded around 1282, although the work on the conserved temple did not begin until 1383, continuing through the 15th century.

Following the introduction of the exclaustration law, the convent was closed in 1836. The building gradually deteriorated until it fell into ruin and by 1846 some of its materials were being used to pave streets. In 1864 a chapel was demolished and between 1869 and 1870 the top part of the tower, located on the south-eastern corner, was torn down.

This is the oldest of all Pontevedra Museum’s buildings. The only sections of the original buildings that have been conserved are the main apse, formed by five apses, exceptional in Galician gothic architecture, and part of the south wall of the church and the entrance to the chapter.

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Details

Founded: 1282
Category: Religious sites in Spain

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

miwi dl (14 months ago)
Cute
Isabella Dicaprio (Isabella) (18 months ago)
I loved this town. I took a train ride around the main areas and it was fantastic. The ruins are fascinating although a bit spoocky. Nice place for food and wine.
Anca Pustianu (2 years ago)
Lovely.
Anca Pustianu (2 years ago)
Lovely.
Lorna Davison (3 years ago)
PonteVedra Spain. A gentle city, great underground parking. Beautiful small churches, The town dressed for the holidays. An opera singer on the square accompanied by professional musicians. Bravo. I would like to spend a week.
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