Castles and fortifications in Germany

Train Castle

The Train water castle (Wasserschloss) was built in the 15th century and destroyed during the Thirty Years" War. The castle has a lovely chapel witha a Rococo altar made by Christian Jorhan (the Elder).
Founded: 15th century | Location: Train, Germany

Englburg Castle

Englburg castle lies on a 581-m-high hill near Tittling. The current castle dates from 1396, after it was destroyed by the citizens of Passau and rebuilt. It was again badly damaged by Swedish troops in the Thirty Year"s War in 1634. After the fire in 1874 the castle got its current appearance. Various noble families have owned the Englburg; the last ones were the Lords of Taufkirchen. The landowner family Niedermei ...
Founded: 1396 | Location: Tittling, Germany

Fronberg Castle

Fronberg Castle was first time mentioned in 1305. It was destroyed in the Landshut War of Succession and badly damaged by fire in 1594. The ironworks of Fronberg was mentioned in 1326.
Founded: c. 1305 | Location: Fronberg, Germany

Wallerstein Castle

Wallerstein Castle is a three-wing building with a classical facade. It is owned by the family Oettingen-Wallerstein and built in the early 1800s.
Founded: 1805 | Location: Wallerstein, Germany

Münchhausen Castle

Münchhausen Castle was mentioned already in 893 AD when it was owned by the Abbey of Prüm in Lorraine. Later the castle was used as a customs office. The 12th and 13th century walls, tower and some buildings have survived. Today the castle is a horse farm with restaurant.
Founded: 9th century | Location: Wachtberg, Germany

Lüftelberg Castle

Burg Lüftelberg is first mentioned in old documents in 1260. In the 15th century it was extended into a castle with four round towers and surrounded by a moat.  The castle obtained its current appearance as of 1730. The court architect Johann Heinrich Roth constructed a Baroque building with high double pitched roofs and a beautiful portal, but used the available walls and integrated three of the four older round tower ...
Founded: 15th century | Location: Meckenheim-Lüftelberg, Germany

Lauterstein Castle

Archeological investigations have shown that the Lauterstein castle was built in the second half of the 12th century. It was first mentioned in writing in 1304 when a document named a Johannis in Lutirstein of the ministerial family of Erdmannsdorf in the castle. Its purpose was the protection of a medieval trade route between Leipzig and Prague across the Ore Mountains. The family of Schellenberg became lords o ...
Founded: 12th century | Location: Marienberg, Germany

Waldershof Castle

The landgraves of Leuchtenberg donated in 1263 the original castle of Waldershof to the Waldsassen monastery. In the following years, the castle was pledged to the family of Hirschberg. It was expanded in 1471. Until secularization in 1803, the castle was used as a judge"s residence.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Waldershof, Germany

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Schloßberg

The Schloßberg is the site of ancient fortress in the centre of the city of Graz, Austria. The hill is now a public park and enjoys extensive views of the city. The fortification of the Schloßberg goes back to at least the 10th century. In the mid-16th century, a 400 m long fortress was constructed by architects from the north of Italy. There are records of a cable-hauled lift being in use between 1528 and 1595 to move construction materials for the fortifications. The castle was never conquered, but it was largely demolished by Napoleonic forces under the Treaty of Schönbrunn of 1809. The clock tower (the Uhrturm) and bell tower (the Glockenturm) were spared after the people of Graz paid a ransom for their preservation.

The remains of the castle were turned into a public park by Ludwig von Welden in 1839. The park contains the Uhrturm, the Glockenturm, a cistern and two bastions from the old castle. The Uhrturm is a recognisable icon for the city, and is unusual in that the clock"s hands have opposite roles to the common notion, with the larger one marking hours while the smaller is for minutes. The Glockenturm contains Liesl, the heaviest bell in Graz.

Near the Uhrturm there is a café with views over the old town. Additionally, on the western side of the Schloßberg, there are two small cafés, one with table service and the other one with self-service. Next to the terminus of the funicular railway there is a hilltop restaurant with views of western Graz. In what was once the cellar of one of the ruined bastions is the Kasemattenbühne, an open-air stage for concerts and performances.

Below the Schloßberg hill is an extensive system of tunnels, which were created during the second world war to protect the civilian population of Graz from aerial bombing. Some of these tunnels are still accessible, including a passage from Schloßbergplatz to Karmeliterplatz, and a grotto railway for children. Also in the tunnel complex is the Dom im Berg, which was expanded in 2000 to provide a venue space for up to 600 people.