Wülzburg Fortress

Weissenburg, Germany

Wülzburg fortress is situated on the highest point of the south Frankenalb, which rises to 640m. Surrounded by adry moat hewn into the rock, it is an imposing and singular monument of a Renaissance fortress in Germany.

From the 11th century onwards a Benedictine monastery stood here. During the Reformation it was dissolved, a provost was put in charge followed by a civil administration in 1537. In 1588 Margrave Georg Friedrich d. A. von Brandenburg-Ansbach erected a pentagonal fortress with the bastions in modern Italian fortification style. The site was well chosen in the southern part of his territory, close to the imperial city of Weissenburg.

To the imperial citizens of Weissenburg the fortress always caused anxiety and posed a threat, especially during the Thirty Years War. In 1631 the fortress, into which the family of the Margrave had fled, was handed over to General Tilly (imperial side) without fighting. Until the end of the war it remained in the hands of the imperial troops or those in league with them. They survived all blockades and brought havoc to the town during periods, when it was held by the enemy.

The original castle tract was destroyed by a great fire. It was re-erected after the Thirty Years' War. In 1791 the fortress passed into Prussian, in 1802 into Bavarian hands. In 1867 its status as fortress was cancelled and in 1882 the Bavarian king sold it- with the exception of the south wing – to Weissenburg. In the 19th and 20th century it served as prison and refugee camp, Charles de Gaulle being kept here in 1918. After 1945 the castle was renovated and now houses aschool.

The castle chapel has the remarkable tombstone of abbot Wilhelm (died 1449).

References:

Comments

Your name



Details

Founded: 1588
Category: Castles and fortifications in Germany
Historical period: Reformation & Wars of Religion (Germany)

More Information

www.weissenburg.info

Rating

4.5/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Jürgen Stante (10 months ago)
Top
Szavuly Tunde (11 months ago)
Super
Oug Dubya (2 years ago)
A fortress full of history overlooking the town of Weissenburg. Tons of trails to walk around the outside of the fortress and a pub in the middle. Also within the fortress are interesting artifacts and ancient ruins. A must see if in the area. If you are a trail runner or mountain biker this is your place. Enjoy the sunset as they are stunning!
Andrea Ortiz (2 years ago)
Beautiful, quiet, serene.
Byron Kastner (2 years ago)
Nice historical building with interesting sights and surroundings. at tha heart of the complex you have the old well which is preserved and available for visitors to date.
Powered by Google

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Fisherman's Bastion

Fisherman's Bastion is a terrace in neo-Gothic and neo-Romanesque style situated on the Buda bank of the Danube, on the Castle hill in Budapest, around Matthias Church. It was designed and built between 1895 and 1902 on the plans of Frigyes Schulek. Construction of the bastion destabilised the foundations of the neighbouring 13th century Dominican Church which had to be pulled down. Between 1947–48, the son of Frigyes Schulek, János Schulek, conducted the other restoration project after its near destruction during World War II.

From the towers and the terrace a panoramic view exists of Danube, Margaret Island, Pest to the east and the Gellért Hill.

Its seven towers represent the seven Magyar tribes that settled in the Carpathian Basin in 896.

The Bastion takes its name from the guild of fishermen that was responsible for defending this stretch of the city walls in the Middle Ages. It is a viewing terrace, with many stairs and walking paths.

A bronze statue of Stephen I of Hungary mounted on a horse, erected in 1906, can be seen between the Bastion and the Matthias Church. The pedestal was made by Alajos Stróbl, based on the plans of Frigyes Schulek, in Neo-Romanesque style, with episodes illustrating the King's life.