Cathedrals in Italy

Foggia Cathedral

Foggia Cathedral is the seat of the Archbishop of Foggia-Bovino. The present Romanesque building was constructed as a collegiate church in the 1170s, but was damaged in the earthquake of 1731 and restored in a Baroque style. When the Diocese of Foggia was created in 1855, the collegiate church was declared its cathedral. The diocese was elevated to an archdiocese in 1979 and amalgamated with the Diocese of Bo ...
Founded: 1170s | Location: Foggia, Italy

Gravina Co-Cathedral

Since 1986 Gravina Cathedral has served as a co-cathedral of the Diocese of Altamura-Gravina-Acquaviva delle Fonti. It was built here at the end of the 11th century by Humphrey of Hauteville, Count of Apulia and Calabria, and thus lord of the town. This church was destroyed in the years 1447-1456 by a fire followed by an earthquake, after being refurbished in a Renaissance-Romanesque style. Of the original church only ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Gravina in Puglia, Italy

Bovino Co-Cathedral

Bovino Cathedral (Basilica Concattedrale di Santa Maria Assunta) is a Roman Catholic cathedral in Bovino, region of Apulia, dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin Mary. Formerly the episcopal seat of the Diocese of Bovino, it has been since 1986 a co-cathedral in the Archdiocese of Foggia-Bovino. The site is an ancient one, but the cathedral was destroyed in an earthquake in 1930 and the present building is a 20th-cen ...
Founded: 1936 | Location: Bovino, Italy

Rossano Cathedral

Rossano Cathedral is the seat of the Archbishop of Rossano-Cariati. The cathedral was built in the 11th century, with substantial reconstruction in the 18th and 19th centuries. It has a central nave and two side-aisles, terminating in three apses. The bell tower and the baptismal font date from the 14th century, while the other artworks and furnishings are of the 17th and 18th centuries. The cathedral houses an ancient ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Corigliano-Rossano, Italy

Agrigento Cathedral

Founded towards the end of the 11th century by Bishop Gerlando, this Norman-Gothic style Agrigento Cathedral was enlarged and remodelled several times as of the 14th and up till the 17th century, only preserving, of the original structure, its magnificent mullioned windows still visible on the right side. Its facade is accessed by a wide, easy staircase, flanked by the magnificent, unfinished 15th century belltower embell ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Agrigento, Italy

Andria Cathedral

Andria Cathedral is dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin Mary and is the seat of the Bishop of Andria. The present cathedral was built by the Norman Geoffrey of Hauteville, lord of Andria, on top of an earlier small church of the 7th-8th century, which forms the present crypt. It received further extensive refurbishment and reconstruction in the mid-14th century in the Late Gothic style, and again later in the Baroqu ...
Founded: 14th century | Location: Andria, Italy

Termini Imerese Cathedral

Duomo di San Nicola di Bari in Termini Imerese originates from the Norman age, but the current building was erected in 1604 by Antonio Spadafora. It was completed in the late 17th century. Today it has an classical-style structure with three aisles and a beautiful bell tower.
Founded: 1604 | Location: Termini Imerese, Italy

Thiene Cathedral

Thiene Cathedral replaced a previous church of the Assumption which apparently dated from before 1166. Construction was completed by 1314. It was rebuilt in 1625, and was substantially altered in the late 18th century by architect Ottone Calderari. The dome was not added till the 1930s. The nave ceiling is decorated with 15 paintings by Baroque Venetian painters, including Giulio Carpioni and Giovanni Battista Pittoni. N ...
Founded: 1314 | Location: Thiene, Italy

Palmi Cathedral

Palmi Cathedral is the principal church of Palmi in Italy, and co-cathedral of the diocese of Oppido Mamertina-Palmi. There are no accurate reports on the age in which this parish was established. Between 1310 and 1311, is attested in Palmi a church of St. Nicholas was the only one in the village. The church of St. Nicholas is again reminded in some acts of 1532. The church, in 1586, stood clear of the city walls. In the ...
Founded: 1786 | Location: Palmi, Italy

Brugnato Cathedral

According to some sources, supported by finds in the foundations, the first religious building on the site of Brugnato Cathedral was constructed in the 7th century over a palaeochristian necropolis, the church of a monastery dependent on Bobbio Abbey, founded by and dedicated to Saint Columbanus. It was rebuilt in the 11th-12th centuries, passed to a resident community of Benedictine monks, and became in 1133 the seat of ...
Founded: 11th century | Location: Brugnato, Italy

Adria Cathedral

Adria Cathedral (Duomo di Adria) replaced the much older former cathedral nearby, dedicated to Saint John, which continues in use as a parish church. The new cathedral, dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul, was built in the early 19th century over a 14th-century church. When works were undertaken in 1830 to investigate the stability of the foundations, a Byzantine crypt and frescoes were discovered. The cathedral also con ...
Founded: 1830 | Location: Adria, Italy

Manfredonia Cathedral

Manfredonia Cathedral is dedicated to Saint Laurence of Siponto, one of the patron saints of the city. The construction of a cathedral, after the transferral here of the seat of the bishops of Siponto, began in 1270 and finished in 1274. The first building was destroyed by the Turks in 1620, and was not rebuilt until 1700, using the ruins of the old Angevin church on the authority of the then bishop, Bartolomeo della Cue ...
Founded: 1270 | Location: Manfredonia, Italy

Castellaneta Cathedral

Castellaneta Cathedral is dedicated to the Assumption of the Virgin Mary. It is the episcopal seat of the Diocese of Castellaneta. The first cathedral on the site was initially dedicated to Saint Nicholas of Bari, and dated at the latest from the Norman occupation of the last decades of the 11th century. In the 14th century, it was replaced with a Romanesque structure with a basilica layout of a central nave and tw ...
Founded: 14th century | Location: Castellaneta, Italy

Torba Abbey

Torba Abbey is a former Benedictine nunnery in the Castelseprio Archaeological Park. This in turn forms part of the serial site 'Longobards in Italy, Places of Power (568–774 A.D.)', comprising seven sites of especial importance for Lombard arts in architecture, pictures and sculpture, entered on the UNESCO List of World Heritage Sites in 2011. History The first nucleus of the Castelseprio complex, of ...
Founded: 8th century AD | Location: Castelseprio, Italy

Ascoli Satriano Cathedral

Ascoli Satriano Cathedral was built in the late 13th century and it was elevated as a cathedral in 1455. It was largely extended and rebuilt in the 18th century and again in 1871 after a disastrous earthquake.
Founded: 13th century | Location: Ascoli Satriano, Italy

Patti Cathedral

Patti Cathedral is the episcopal seat of the Diocese of Patti. The Norman age cathedral was rebuilt almost entirely after 1693 earthquake, but the bell tower dates from 1588.
Founded: 1094 | Location: Patti, Italy

Locri Cathedral

Locri Cathedral was built in 1933 by order of Mgr. Giorgio Delrio, bishop of Gerace (1906-1920). It represents the Lombard Romanesque style. The interior, on a Latin cross groundplan, has three aisles: the two side aisles terminate in small chapels. The central part of the north aisle contains a marble sculpture depicting Bishop Francesco Saverio Mangeruva (1872-1905) and the sarcophagus of Bishop Michele Alberto Arduino ...
Founded: 1933 | Location: Locri, Italy

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Broch of Gurness

The Broch of Gurness is an Iron Age broch village. Settlement here began sometime between 500 and 200 BC. At the centre of the settlement is a stone tower or broch, which once probably reached a height of around 10 metres. Its interior is divided into sections by upright slabs. The tower features two skins of drystone walls, with stone-floored galleries in between. These are accessed by steps. Stone ledges suggest that there was once an upper storey with a timber floor. The roof would have been thatched, surrounded by a wall walk linked by stairs to the ground floor. The broch features two hearths and a subterranean stone cistern with steps leading down into it. It is thought to have some religious significance, relating to an Iron Age cult of the underground.

The remains of the central tower are up to 3.6 metres high, and the stone walls are up to 4.1 metres thick. The tower was likely inhabited by the principal family or clan of the area but also served as a last resort for the village in case of an attack.

The broch continued to be inhabited while it began to collapse and the original structures were altered. The cistern was filled in and the interior was repartitioned. The ruin visible today reflects this secondary phase of the broch's use.

The site is surrounded by three ditches cut out of the rock with stone ramparts, encircling an area of around 45 metres diameter. The remains of numerous small stone dwellings with small yards and sheds can be found between the inner ditch and the tower. These were built after the tower, but were a part of the settlement's initial conception. A 'main street' connects the outer entrance to the broch. The settlement is the best-preserved of all broch villages.

Pieces of a Roman amphora dating to before 60 AD were found here, lending weight to the record that a 'King of Orkney' submitted to Emperor Claudius at Colchester in 43 AD.

At some point after 100 AD the broch was abandoned and the ditches filled in. It is thought that settlement at the broch continued into the 5th century AD, the period known as Pictish times. By that time the broch was not used anymore and some of its stones were reused to build smaller dwellings on top of the earlier buildings. Until about the 8th century, the site was just a single farmstead.

In the 9th century, a Norse woman was buried at the site in a stone-lined grave with two bronze brooches and a sickle and knife made from iron. Other finds suggest that Norse men were buried here too.