Häädemeeste Orthodox Church

Häädemeeste, Estonia

In the 1840’s, 80% of the people of Häädemeeste changed their Lutheran faith for the Orthodox one hoping, as a result of converting to the religion of the Russian imperial house, to secure for themselves a piece of land in return. Such calls were made throughout Estonia. The first Orthodox congregation of the neighborhood, the Häädemeeste congregation, was established in 1849, the church was ready in 1872. The highest top of the Apostolic Orthodox Church of Transfiguration of Our Lord is the clock tower with an onion shaped dome over the western entrance. The pride of the interior is an eclectic three-story style iconostasis with a sumptuous decor.

Reference: Romantiline Rannatee

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The Kalozha church of Saints Boris and Gleb is the oldest extant structure in Hrodna. It is the only surviving monument of ancient Black Ruthenian architecture, distinguished from other Orthodox churches by prolific use of polychrome faceted stones of blue, green or red tint which could be arranged to form crosses or other figures on the wall.

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