Hungarian State Opera House

Budapest, Hungary

The Budapest opera house is a beautiful Neo-Renaissance building opened in 1884. Construction included the use of marble and frescos by some of the best artisans of that era. Designed by Miklós Ybl, one of Europe's leading architects in the mid to late 19th century, the Budapest Opera House quickly became one of the most prestigious musical institutions in Europe. Many important artists performed here, including Gustav Mahler, who was also the director for three seasons.

The Budapest Opera House is considered to be amongst the best opera houses in the world in terms of its acoustics, and has an auditorium that seats 1200 people. It is horseshoe-shaped and, according to measurements done by a group of international engineers, has the third best acoustics amongst similar European venues (after the Scala in Milan and the Paris Opera House). The statue of Ferenc Erkel stands in front of the Opera House. He was the composer of the Hungarian national anthem and the first music director of the Opera. The other statue in front of the Budapest Opera is of Ferenc Liszt, the well-known Hungarian composer.

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Founded: 1884
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Hungary

Rating

4.4/5 (based on Google user reviews)

User Reviews

Charlotte CHAPUIS (7 months ago)
Magnificent Neo-Renaissance opera house with a horseshoe-shaped auditorium! Unfortunately it is always being renovated, we have the impression that we only see a part of it that has been uncovered on each visit
Caroline Mc K (7 months ago)
aw two ballets from standing room and the top balcony. Standing room offered great sightlines for the price, and there's a ledge you can lean on. Lots of interesting costume/set design displays in the hallways and lounges -- worth venturing onto a different floor during intermission to check them out.
Carolyn Mc K (7 months ago)
aw two ballets from standing room and the top balcony. Standing room offered great sightlines for the price, and there's a ledge you can lean on. Lots of interesting costume/set design displays in the hallways and lounges -- worth venturing onto a different floor during intermission to check them out.
Gidon Idy (9 months ago)
Budapest Opera House is a legendary place! There is guided tours! I loved it and I am sure if you like operas you will love it too!
Ale Buc (10 months ago)
The Place Is closed for renovations and they still have tickets on sale on their website. You can't see anything and no one tells you it's closed.
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