The Savoy Castle is an 18th-century Baroque style palace. Construction of the spacious home was begun in 1702 at the commissioning of Prince Eugene of Savoy and finished in approximately 1722. Prince Eugene of Savoy acquired Csepel Island in 1698, and thereafter began the planning process of this 'maison de plaisance'.

Eugene commissioned Johann Lucas von Hildebrandt, a student of the Roman Carlo Fontana, to design the castle. Seven letters from Hildebrandt to the prince remain in the archives of the Gonzaga family in Mantua and evidence planning and construction information about the castle.

The castle has side-wings which were completed in 1714, and the whole construction process was finished around 1720 to 1722. The prince did not reside in Ráckeve mansion after it was finished, and following his death, the estate was appropriated by the Crown.

Under the reign of Maria Theresia of Austria, the mansion and the adjoining land in Csepel was managed by the Hungarian Chancery. In 1814, the middle part of the mansion, along with the stately Baroque cupola, was destroyed by fire; what is seen today was rebuilt after the fire.

Until its reconstruction in the 1980s, the mansion suffered constant decline. The castle has enjoyed renovation and revitalization, and it is now used as a hotel, which is called the Savoyai Mansion Hotel.

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Details

Founded: 1702-1722
Category: Palaces, manors and town halls in Hungary

More Information

en.wikipedia.org

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User Reviews

Gabriella Gál (7 months ago)
There is not much to see from the castle outside the fence.
Dániel Lengyel (2 years ago)
I don't think it can be visited.
Good Videos Old Channel (3 years ago)
This is the best hotel in the world if I were a hotel critic I would give it 5 stars I wish it wasn't closed
Attila Heidum (4 years ago)
Hans Schafitel (5 years ago)
Auf unserer Radreise 2013 entlang der Donau zum Schwarzen Meer radelten wir auch durch Ráckeve und entdeckten das Schloss von „Prinz Eugen zu Savojen“. Hier unser kleiner Reisaebericht: Erst nach Tököl nimmt der starke Verkehr ab und wir radeln auf kleinen Landstraßen, die auch gleichzeitig den Donaudamm bilden, weiter in Richtung Szegetujfalu nach Rackeve. Hier steht das Schloss von „Prinz Eugen zu Savojen“ und die einzige serbisch-orthodoxe Kirche Ungarns. Wir fertigten auch hier einige Bilder und stellten am Ortsschild fest, dass Rackeve die Partnergemeinde von Waghäusl ist. Nach einer Fisch- bzw. Erbsensuppe verlassen wir um 13.50 Uhr Rackeve wieder, gelangen über eine Brücke auf die linke Seite des Kanals „Rackevei-Duna“ und haben einen herrlichen Blick auf die Stadt.
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