Religious sites in Finland

Teisko Church

Teisko church was completed in 1788, but it was inaugurated and taken into use in August 1787 while the construction work was still incomplete. This was necessary due to the poor condition of the previous church. The bell-tower was made ten years later by Åkerblom. The basic form of the church is a cross with sloped inside angles. Of the many repairs performed on this wood-framed church, the overall look of the bui ...
Founded: 1788 | Location: Tampere, Finland

Ruovesi Church

Sophia Magdalena Church in Ruovesi was completed in 1778 and designed by Matti Åkerblom. The adjacent bell tower was made by Antti Piimänen in 1772. The church was originally red, but it was repainted with current yellow color in 1861-1862.
Founded: 1778 | Location: Ruovesi, Finland

The Church of Maria Magdalena

The church of Maria Magdalena is a medieval stone church built during 15th and 16th century, probably around years 1500-1520. The church has been renovated 1859-1861 and again 1968.
Founded: 1450-1520 | Location: Föglö, Finland

The Church of St. Olaf

The Church of St. Olaf was built in around 1260-1280s, but the oldest parts may date back to the previous century. The wall paintings decorating the interior is from the 1280s. The present appearance of the church dates from the extensions in the 19th century. Jomala Church is the oldest remaining church in Finland.
Founded: 1260-1290 | Location: Jomala, Finland

The Church of St. Birgitta

The Church of St. Birgitta is one of the oldest churches in Finland. Main hall of stone church is from the end of 13th century and oldest wooden parts of bell tower were built between 1311 and 1316. The sacristy was built in the 1450s. Church was enlarged during 17th century. Oldest lime wall paintings in the church were made around year 1300.
Founded: 1290-1316 | Location: Lemland, Finland

The Church of St. Mary

The present greystone church of St. Mary was built to replace a wooden church at the latter half of 14th century. The tower was built around 1380 and it has baroque fashioned top added in the 18th century.Church is located to the largest Iron Age grave field in Åland and there are some remains of Viking Age living in surroundings.
Founded: 1370-1380 | Location: Saltvik, Finland

Tuulos Church

The greystone church of Tuulos was built probably between years 1510-1540, but the oldest part, the sacristy, was built by Sairiala estate owner Knut Posse between 1477-1485. There is a Posse family coat of arms in the northern wall of sacristy. The church may have been sanctified to St. Bridget of Sweden.
Founded: 1510-1540 | Location: Tuulos, Finland

Tyrväntö Stone Sacristy

The sacristy was part of a wooden church of Tyrväntö and built probably at the beginning of 16th century. It is supposed to be the first part of a planned stone church, but the plan was never finished.
Founded: 1500 | Location: Hattula, Finland

Urjala Stone Sacristy

The sacristy was built probably 1520-1540 and was part of a wooden church till 1806. It is supposed to be the first part of a planned stone church, but the plan was never finished.
Founded: 1520-1540 | Location: Urjala, Finland

The Church of St. Catherine

The site of the present church in Huittinen is an old pagan sacred grove. First stone church was built there around the year 1500. Today only the eastern hall remains as part of the present church (which is extended and modified several times during centuries). Even in the 18th century church was used as a grave for priests and other important persons. Last burial in Huittinen church was made in 1794.
Founded: 1500 | Location: Huittinen, Finland

Halikko Church

The oldest record of church in Halikko is dated back to the year 1352. The wooden church was replaced probably approximately 1440. Original, two-aisle church was dedicated to St. Birgit. During the Reformation old chalk paintings were overpainted and church was left to dilapidate. Too small and dicky church was renovated and expanded in 1799 and again in 1813-1815. The old sacristy, weapons room and the tomb of famous nob ...
Founded: 1440 | Location: Salo, Finland

Kemiö Church

The present Kemiö stone church replaced the previous wooden church probably in 1469. The bell tower was erected in 1786-1788. The church was originally dedicated to St. Andrew. Fire has damaged Kemiö church several times during centuries. The latest renovation was made in 1920-1922. It was funded by the famous businessman and patron Amos Andersson and designed by architect Armas Lindgren.
Founded: 1469 | Location: Kemiö, Finland

Laitila Church

Laitila Church, dedicated to St. Michael, was erected probably in 1460-1483. The mural paintings were made in 1483 by students of famous Petrus Henriksson. There are also a crucifix from the 15th century and pulpit from 17th century.
Founded: 1460-1483 | Location: Laitila, Finland

Lemu Church

The mediaeval greystone church is dedicated to St. Olav and was built in the 1450's. Long ago, Lemu was part of the great Nousiainen ancient parish, but parted to an independent administrative and ecclesiastical parish in the Middle Ages. When an episcopal church was erected in the old mother parish, a sanctuary consecrated to St. Olav was built also in Lemu. First, a small wooden chapel was raised on Toijainen hill prob ...
Founded: 1460-1480 | Location: Masku, Finland

The Church of St. Henry

The first record of church in Nousiainen dates back to the year 1232. This refers to a smaller church dedicated to Our Lady which was probably built of wood. Nousiainen was a home of archdiocese in Finland from the early Middle Age and there have probably been several wooden churches before the present one. Archaeologists have found from the church area remains of graveyards dated back to the beginning of 11th century. S ...
Founded: 1420-1430 | Location: Nousiainen, Finland

Pertteli Church

The Pertteli Church was built probably between years 1500 and 1520 and was dedicated to St. Bartholomeus. First record of the local Uskela parish is from the 14th century and there has been at least one wooden church in Pertteli before. The original stone church was enlarged in the 18th and 19th centuries. Finnish National Board of Antiquities has named the ancient road ("Hiidentie") and the church area as national built ...
Founded: 1500-1520 | Location: Salo, Finland

Mietoinen Church

Mietoinen Church was built in 1641-1643 and it’s one of the rare stone churches built after the Reformation in the 17th century. It was funded by Henrik Fleming, who was the owner of near Lehtinen manor. The church has been reconstructed several times in the 19th century, and the tower was added in 1818-1819. There are some medieval artefacts inside the church, like the wooden crucifix from the 16th century.Mietoine ...
Founded: 1641-1643 | Location: Mynämäki, Finland

Pöytyä Church

The wooden cruciform church in Pöytyä was built in the year 1793 and was designed by Mikael Piimänen. Next to the church there is a rare timber enclosure from the old church. At the church square there is a clearer´s statue and on the graveyard a soldier´s statue, both designed by Aarre Aaltonen. There are also monuments of Antti Lizelius and Fr. G. Hedberg in the church area. The church milieu ...
Founded: 1793 | Location: Pöytyä, Finland

Velkua Church

Velkua Church, also known as St. Henry’s Church, was built in 1793. The wooden church is the only one ever built to Velkua. After the Palva sea battle in 1808 Russian soldiers robbed all movable inside the church. Only the original altarpiece survived and is still in the church. New church bells were added in 1813. Today the church site is marked as national built heritage by National Board of Antiques.
Founded: 1793 | Location: Naantali, Finland

Yläne Church

The church of St. Olaf was built in the year 1782 and is located in the place of an old chapel built in 1663. The shrine of Yläne is a combination of a cruciform church and a basilica, and is seated for 600 people. It was designed by Mikael Piimänen. The organ of the church is one of the oldest in Finland. The church site, cemetery and near vicarage are defined as national built herigate by National Board of Ant ...
Founded: 1782 | Location: Pöytyä, Finland

Featured Historic Landmarks, Sites & Buildings

Historic Site of the week

Wroclaw Town Hall

The Old Town Hall of Wrocław is one of the main landmarks of the city. The Old Town Hall's long history reflects developments that have taken place in the city since its initial construction. The town hall serves the city of Wroclaw and is used for civic and cultural events such as concerts held in its Great Hall. In addition, it houses a museum and a basement restaurant.

The town hall was developed over a period of about 250 years, from the end of 13th century to the middle of 16th century. The structure and floor plan changed over this extended period in response to the changing needs of the city. The exact date of the initial construction is not known. However, between 1299 and 1301 a single-storey structure with cellars and a tower called the consistory was built. The oldest parts of the current building, the Burghers’ Hall and the lower floors of the tower, may date to this time. In these early days the primary purpose of the building was trade rather than civic administration activities.

Between 1328 and 1333 an upper storey was added to include the Council room and the Aldermen’s room. Expansion continued during the 14th century with the addition of extra rooms, most notably the Court room. The building became a key location for the city’s commercial and administrative functions.

The 15th and 16th centuries were times of prosperity for Wroclaw as was reflected in the rapid development of the building during that period. The construction program gathered momentum, particularly from 1470 to 1510, when several rooms were added. The Burghers’ Hall was re-vaulted to take on its current shape, and the upper story began to take shape with the development of the Great Hall and the addition of the Treasury and Little Treasury.

Further innovations during the 16th century included the addition of the city’s Coat of arms (1536), and the rebuilding of the upper part of the tower (1558–59). This was the final stage of the main building program. By 1560, the major features of today’s Stray Rates were established.

The second half of the 17th century was a period of decline for the city, and this decline was reflected in the Stray Rates. Perhaps by way of compensation, efforts were made to enrich the interior decorations of the hall. In 1741, Wroclaw became a part of Prussia, and the power of the City diminished. Much of the Stray Rates was allocated to administering justice.

During the 19th century there were two major changes. The courts moved to a separate building, and the Rates became the site of the city council and supporting functions. There was also a major program of renovation because the building had been neglected and was covered with creeping vines. The town hall now has several en-Gothic features including some sculptural decoration from this period.

In the early years of the 20th century improvements continued with various repair work and the addition of the Little Bear statue in 1902. During the 1930s, the official role of the Rates was reduced and it was converted into a museum. By the end of World War II Town Hall suffered minor damage, such as aerial bomb pierced the roof (but not exploded) and some sculptural elements were lost. Restoration work began in the 1950s following a period of research, and this conservation effort continued throughout the 20th century. It included refurbishment of the clock on the east facade.